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March 25, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a challenge to both President Alfredo Cristiani and the United Nations, El Salvador's top military commanders angrily denounced an international investigation that blamed them for widespread wartime atrocities, and they suggested that they would fight their ouster. The bitter military response to the U.N.
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NEWS
October 31, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly four years after the signing of a peace agreement to end more than a decade of civil war, the government today missed its deadline for completing the reforms promised in the treaty, according to the U.N. mission overseeing implementation. The U.N.
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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | Reuters
The United Nations will abolish its current Central American peacekeeping unit and send its members soon to El Salvador, where a final peace agreement is nearly completed, diplomats said Friday. Under a peace plan initialed in New York on New Year's Eve, leftist guerrillas and the government will end 12 years of fighting with a cease-fire Feb. 1. To get U.N. military observers there in time, the U.N.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to put to rest an episode that devastated the credibility of El Salvador's former guerrillas and embarrassed the United Nations, U.N. officials certified Wednesday that the onetime rebels have finally surrendered the bulk of their weapons. An explosion three months ago in a hidden arms dump in Nicaragua revealed that the leftist guerrillas, despite their assurances to the contrary, had hidden tons of weapons, including antiaircraft missiles, in violation of U.N.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | From Reuters
President Alfredo Cristiani sharply criticized a U.N. plan to preserve El Salvador's fragile peace Wednesday and said promised military cuts will be delayed until leftist guerrillas destroy all their weapons. "We cannot accept that there are political conditions that merit a rescheduling (of the peace accords), which is what the U.N. secretary general's proposal brings," Cristiani said in a televised address to the nation.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conceding that he needs more time to purge this nation's powerful armed forces of human rights abusers, Salvadoran President Alfredo Cristiani announced Wednesday that he plans to retain two of his most controversial officers in top government posts. Cristiani confirmed that he has asked the United Nations to allow him to dismiss senior officers gradually on a timetable that sources say could last until the end of his presidency next year.
NEWS
June 19, 1990
A new round of peace talks between the rightist government of San Salvador and leftist guerrillas who have fought it for ten years begin in the Mexican capital today, mediated by a personal representative of United Nations General Secretary Javier Perez de Cuellar. Taking up a peace agenda drawn up last month during secret talks in Caracas, the Mexican meeting will focus on the government's armed forces, which the guerrillas say must be reduced and purged of hard liners.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | From Associated Press
El Salvador's government and leftist rebels met for U.N.-mediated peace talks Wednesday in a new effort to end their civil war, but disagreement quickly surfaced on the issue of a cease-fire. Both sides and U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar agreed to seek a truce as an "initial objective" on the way to a negotiated settlement.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Representatives of the El Salvador government and left-wing FMLN guerrillas will meet U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar in Geneva on Wednesday in a bid to restart peace talks, the United Nations announced. The last effort to end a decade-long civil war between the government and the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN) broke down late last year, shortly before the rebels launched a November offensive.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.N. report rebuked the government of El Salvador for alleged abuses of humanitarian, labor and peasant organizations and said that "death squad" slayings, summary executions and torture have persisted since the massacre of six Jesuit priests by soldiers a year ago. The report by a special human rights representative blames both the U.S.-backed conservative government and rebels for the continuation of violence.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top officers of El Salvador's armed forces were removed from duty Thursday in a U.N.-ordered purge of human rights abusers, marking the end of an era in which a single generation of U.S.-trained officers controlled the army and dominated wartime society. President Alfredo Cristiani, acting six months late, replaced Defense Minister Gen. Rene Emilio Ponce and ordered a complete overhaul of the military high command. He also ordered changes in key military posts around the country.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
President Alfredo Cristiani has reluctantly accepted U.N. demands to remove 15 of El Salvador's top army chiefs from active duty by June 30 under conditions generally agreeable to the United Nations, its secretary general said Friday. Boutros Boutros-Ghali said he regretted that compliance will not occur until months later than envisioned in peace accords.
NEWS
March 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Salvadoran Supreme Court rejected Friday the findings of a report on human rights violations that recommended, among other things, the removal of the justices. The court disputed the Truth Commission's finding that the judges obstructed investigations into some of the rights violations during the past decade, when the U.S.-backed Salvadoran government battled leftist guerrillas.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a challenge to both President Alfredo Cristiani and the United Nations, El Salvador's top military commanders angrily denounced an international investigation that blamed them for widespread wartime atrocities, and they suggested that they would fight their ouster. The bitter military response to the U.N.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid shouts of protest, the right-wing party of President Alfredo Cristiani swiftly pushed through a blanket amnesty Saturday that pardons all Salvadorans who committed political murder and other crimes during 12 years of civil war. In a stormy legislative session that showed just how fresh the war's wounds still are, the national Legislative Assembly approved the amnesty on a 47-9 vote. There were 13 abstentions, and 15 legislators were absent.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release this week of a United Nations report on human rights abuses in El Salvador has resurrected the decade-long debate over U.S. aid to that country and prompted Democratic calls for a thorough investigation of American involvement in one of Central America's bloodiest civil wars. Outraged by the findings of the U.N.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under mounting pressure from El Salvador's right wing, President Alfredo Cristiani on Thursday criticized a U.N. report that blames civil war crimes on state security forces, saying the findings will not contribute to healing this country's wounds. In his first public comments on the report by the U.N.-appointed Commission on Truth, Cristiani said the investigation painted an incomplete picture that dredges up ugly memories and prevents reconciliation.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Marxist guerrillas who fought U.S.-backed Salvadoran forces for more than a decade--and who were championed by many in the American left--killed civilians, shot prisoners and committed other war crimes, a U.N.-sponsored investigation found. The probe by the Commission on Truth blamed the overwhelming majority of violent acts in El Salvador's civil war on state security forces and allied death squads.
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