Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Nations Elections
IN THE NEWS

United Nations Elections

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1993 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles voters this year for the first time can get sample ballots in five Asian languages, officials said Monday. They are Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tagalog and Vietnamese. On Monday, the city began mailing 265,000 postcards offering the service to registered voters in 673 targeted precincts, officials in the city clerk's office said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1993 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles voters this year for the first time can get sample ballots in five Asian languages, officials said Monday. They are Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tagalog and Vietnamese. On Monday, the city began mailing 265,000 postcards offering the service to registered voters in 673 targeted precincts, officials in the city clerk's office said.
Advertisement
WORLD
October 18, 2004 | From Newsday
President Bush rebuffed a plan last month for a Muslim peacekeeping force that would have helped the United Nations organize elections in Iraq, according to Saudi and Iraqi officials. The U.N. has a skeletal presence in Iraq, with only four employees working full time preparing for January elections. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has refused to establish a new headquarters in Baghdad unless countries commit troops for a special force to protect it.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1991
While working in Haiti as a radio engineer during the past three years, I had the chance to observe the political scene there firsthand. Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the ousted president of Haiti, received over 80% of the vote in last December's United Nations-supervised elections. Many people claim that Aristide is Haiti's first honestly elected president. His government legitimately derives its power from the 6 million citizens of Haiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997
Star-crossed Cambodia has been yanked back onto the front page by resurging violence, a fate its beleaguered people do not deserve. Ghosts of the 1970s and '80s stalk reports from Phnom Penh, the sprawling capital on the Mekong River. The genocidal Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot is reported to be a captive of his own cruel men somewhere near the Thai border.
WORLD
February 16, 2004 | Richard Simon and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
Despite continuing attacks against Iraqis and American troops, the United States remains committed to handing over power to an interim Iraqi government by the end of June, the top American civilian administrator in Iraq said Sunday. "Iraqis all want sovereignty back as soon as it can be done," L. Paul Bremer III said on CNN's "Late Edition." "We want to be here as invited guests and no longer as an occupying force."
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has begun pressuring the United Nations to allow U.S. forces in Haiti to turn over their peacekeeping responsibilities to U.N. troops in January or February, rather than after Haitian elections later next year, U.S. officials said Tuesday. U.S. strategists met privately in Washington with senior U.N. officials earlier this week to begin mapping plans for transferring the peacekeeping mission to a 6,000-soldier multinational force, as provided for in the long-range U.S.
WORLD
August 2, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
When he finally emerged from court this year, criminal charges dropped, Carlos Fernando Chamorro had survived his latest battle with Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega. Chamorro is almost as emblematic of Nicaragua's 30-year-old Sandinista revolution as Ortega. During Ortega's first presidency, in the decade that followed the 1979 revolution, Chamorro edited the official newspaper Barricada, largely a mouthpiece for the Sandinista National Liberation Front, or FSLN.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica struggles to consolidate power in Belgrade, Kosovo is heading toward its first United Nations-supervised elections, with its ethnic Albanian leaders confident that their fight for independence already has been won. Leaders of ethnic Albanian parties say that even if Kostunica tries to use his ties with the West to restore Serbian authority in Kosovo, they see no risk that such an effort would succeed.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | ROBIN McDOWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When 18-year-old Sos Kun was taken to a public hospital recently with a bullet in her spine, surgeons and nurses in the emergency ward paid no attention. They wanted $140 up front before doing anything. "I held the hand of one of the nurses and begged for help," said Yan Kong, the girl's mother. "I told them the money is on the way, but please do something or she will die. But they did nothing."
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | ROBIN McDOWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Passengers hurriedly hoist their luggage, bundles and baskets of vegetables onto the first car. Then they clamber aboard as the train creaks out of the station, heading west to Pursat. They don't seem to mind that they aren't riding in a coach. Pushed ahead of the locomotive, the first car is a five-ton flatbed of heavy iron. It is there to detonate any land mines and protect the locomotive from the blast--a bleak sign of Cambodia's war that will not end.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|