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NEWS
May 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One billion people breathe unhealthy air, the fouling of the Earth's water and farmland is increasing and malnutrition and skin cancer are on the rise, according to a report issued by the United Nations Environment Program. And the situation is much worse than it was 20 years ago, the report concluded. Among the findings: In developing countries, 13.5 million children under age 5 die each year from malnutrition, poor sanitation and lack of vaccines.
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NEWS
June 8, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators here are on the verge of settling their most contentious disputes over environmental foreign aid and eliminating the issue that has posed the greatest potential for a disastrous rift between rich and poor nations at the Earth Summit. Barring an eleventh-hour reversal today, delegates cleaning up details of an environmental action plan are expected to accept a compromise negotiating text forged during three days of delicate talks.
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NEWS
April 15, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
International efforts to help Third World countries switch from chemicals that destroy the Earth's protective ozone layer are being hampered by a lack of funds and inadequate planning, two officials said Sunday. Despite a pledge made last June, most industrialized nations have not paid their share of $54 million in annual contributions to an unprecedented environmental fund to help developing nations turn to safer chemical substitutes, a United Nations official said.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN and RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A parade of nations began signing a biological diversity treaty Friday without the United States joining in, further diminishing its already battered stature at a global environmental summit here. A spokeswoman for the United Nations Environment Program said at least 40 nations, including Germany, France and Canada, have pledged to sign the pact, aimed at conserving plants, animals and microorganisms and their habitat. Ratification by 30 nations is required for the treaty to take effect.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN and RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A parade of nations began signing a biological diversity treaty Friday without the United States joining in, further diminishing its already battered stature at a global environmental summit here. A spokeswoman for the United Nations Environment Program said at least 40 nations, including Germany, France and Canada, have pledged to sign the pact, aimed at conserving plants, animals and microorganisms and their habitat. Ratification by 30 nations is required for the treaty to take effect.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators here are on the verge of settling their most contentious disputes over environmental foreign aid and eliminating the issue that has posed the greatest potential for a disastrous rift between rich and poor nations at the Earth Summit. Barring an eleventh-hour reversal today, delegates cleaning up details of an environmental action plan are expected to accept a compromise negotiating text forged during three days of delicate talks.
TRAVEL
January 22, 2012
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NEWS
June 6, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Friends of the United Nations Environment Program Tuesday presented a media achievement award to the Los Angeles Times "in recognition of its outstanding coverage of environmental issues." Winners of a national poster contest based on the theme of "The Earth is for Tomorrow's Children" also were honored at a Capitol Hill reception marking World Environment Day. Friends President Richard A.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Du Pont Will Accelerate CFC Phase-Out: The giant chemical company announced that it will hurry its own timetable for ending production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), in response to findings by the United Nations Environment Program and the World Meteorological Organization that stratospheric ozone depletion was advancing faster than expected. Du Pont said it would up its phase-out of CFCs and Halons by three to five years--to 1994 for Halons and 1996 for CFCs. William K.
SCIENCE
February 18, 2002
The dugong, a mammal considered to be the inspiration for seafarers' tales of mermaids, is disappearing from the planet, an indication of the degradation of coastal environments, the United Nations Environment Program said last week. The animal is gone from many of its habitats in the Indian Ocean and South China Sea and is on the brink of vanishing from the Indian Ocean off East Africa, the agency said.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One billion people breathe unhealthy air, the fouling of the Earth's water and farmland is increasing and malnutrition and skin cancer are on the rise, according to a report issued by the United Nations Environment Program. And the situation is much worse than it was 20 years ago, the report concluded. Among the findings: In developing countries, 13.5 million children under age 5 die each year from malnutrition, poor sanitation and lack of vaccines.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
International efforts to help Third World countries switch from chemicals that destroy the Earth's protective ozone layer are being hampered by a lack of funds and inadequate planning, two officials said Sunday. Despite a pledge made last June, most industrialized nations have not paid their share of $54 million in annual contributions to an unprecedented environmental fund to help developing nations turn to safer chemical substitutes, a United Nations official said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Singer Olivia Newton-John, the new goodwill ambassador for the United Nations' Environment Program, says individuals can help save the environment in simple ways. "I can tell people that they can make a difference, that they should not feel powerless and feel the problem is up to someone else," she said Monday. When her daughter was born four years ago, Newton-John said, she "felt a sense of my own mortality and wanted to leave her a better world."
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Amid a health scare triggered by NATO's use of munitions containing depleted uranium, Yugoslav officials tried Saturday to allay fears that the substance could be harmful to residents, while a World Health Organization official said there had been no increase in leukemia cases in Kosovo. U.N. scientists who visited 11 areas struck by NATO munitions in Kosovo, a province of Serbia, Yugoslavia's main republic, have confirmed they found signs of radioactivity at eight of the sites.
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