Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Nations Estonia
IN THE NEWS

United Nations Estonia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration pledged Tuesday to help the newly recognized Baltic republics cope with some of the problems that will accompany their independence, but officials warned that large-scale U.S. economic aid is unlikely. "We'll want to be able to work out what's the most appropriate way of working directly with the Baltic states to support their independence and support them along the path that they have chosen," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking sign of the Cold War's end, seven nations, including the three Baltic states and the two divided Koreas, joined the United Nations on Tuesday. All had been barred admission previously by the U.S.-Soviet competition. The new president of the U.N. General Assembly, Saudi Ambassador Samir S. Shihabi, declared the new members admitted by acclamation after last week's approval by the Security Council.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers from Europe, Canada and the United States gather here today to launch a major human rights conference in the after-glow of democracy's recent triumphs in the Soviet Union but amid growing concern about what the dizzying changes may have brought. The crumbling of authoritarian power following last month's abortive coup against President Mikhail S.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign ministers from Europe, Canada and the United States gather here today to launch a major human rights conference in the after-glow of democracy's recent triumphs in the Soviet Union but amid growing concern about what the dizzying changes may have brought. The crumbling of authoritarian power following last month's abortive coup against President Mikhail S.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking sign of the Cold War's end, seven nations, including the three Baltic states and the two divided Koreas, joined the United Nations on Tuesday. All had been barred admission previously by the U.S.-Soviet competition. The new president of the U.N. General Assembly, Saudi Ambassador Samir S. Shihabi, declared the new members admitted by acclamation after last week's approval by the Security Council.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration pledged Tuesday to help the newly recognized Baltic republics cope with some of the problems that will accompany their independence, but officials warned that large-scale U.S. economic aid is unlikely. "We'll want to be able to work out what's the most appropriate way of working directly with the Baltic states to support their independence and support them along the path that they have chosen," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|