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United Nations Finances

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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Tuesday ordered the release to the United Nations of $188 million in back dues from the United States, averting a financial crisis at the world organization as it struggles with crucial peacekeeping efforts in several regions of the globe. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater, announcing the unfreezing of the payments, said the President took the action because of U.N.
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NEWS
June 21, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the days leading up to a U.N. global conference on combating HIV and AIDS, new donors--public and private--have breathed life into an international trust fund whose fate hung in the balance as recently as last month. A $100-million pledge this week from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and $1 million given earlier this month by Switzerland-based Winterthur insurance group show that even the private sector sees benefit in joining the fight--now that it has become clear that the U.N.
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NEWS
October 15, 1988 | Associated Press
The United States on Friday paid $85.6 million to the financially beleaguered United Nations, reducing its debt to the regular budget to $366.3 million. The payment was made two days after the Soviet Union, which is paying its own arrears, pledged the equivalent of $600 million to U.N. relief and reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan. A U.N. statement said the U.S. payment was the second installment of the $188 million that President Reagan promised to pay by the end of the year.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N.'s lead refugee agency announced Friday that it will have to cut key aid programs and nearly 1,000 jobs because donor countries have failed for two years in a row to come through with funds they had pledged. Ruud Lubbers, the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, said that the "painful but absolutely necessary" cuts will be spread among programs around the world in order to minimize their impact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kofi Annan, the secretary-general of the United Nations, visited California in part to recruit celebrities to the cause of boosting the world organization. Much to his surprise, he found himself treated as a celebrity. Annan, on Tuesday in Los Angeles and in the Bay Area on Sunday and Monday, was hailed and stopped by passersby on the street and in hotel lobbies. Tourists in San Francisco leaned out of cable cars to snap his picture. He received standing ovations whenever he spoke.
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Clinton administration officials appealed to the House not to put antiabortion language in an $18-billion bill for the International Monetary Fund. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin told reporters that national security could be compromised if the bill does not pass.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government's top economic policymakers urged Congress on Friday to increase the U.S. contribution to the International Monetary Fund, warning that failing to do so might jeopardize the bailout of Asian economies and ultimately hurt the United States as well. Testifying before the House Banking Committee, Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan and Treasury Secretary Robert E.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1998 | Associated Press
Much of the first money allocated from Ted Turner's $1-billion gift to the United Nations will go to the U.N. Population Fund, an agency known for being unpopular with Congress. Nearly $8 million will be earmarked for programs of the Population Fund, which has been attacked by conservative congressmen for supporting family planning. In the allocation, 42% of the money will go to women's programs.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
After a yearlong battle and round-the-clock final negotiations, the General Assembly on Saturday adopted its first major overhaul of U.N. financing in more than two decades, cutting U.S. payments to the world body and shifting most of the shortfall to developing countries with improving economies.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali warned Wednesday that the United Nations' financial crisis, contrary to what doubters think, is so real and dangerous that he may have to start closing the organization down next summer if the United States and others refuse to pay what they owe. The U.S. failure to pay has induced many other countries to hold back, the secretary-general told reporters and editors in the Los Angeles Times' Washington Bureau.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
After a yearlong battle and round-the-clock final negotiations, the General Assembly on Saturday adopted its first major overhaul of U.N. financing in more than two decades, cutting U.S. payments to the world body and shifting most of the shortfall to developing countries with improving economies.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
CNN founder Ted Turner has offered to make up the $35-million difference between the dues that the United States owes to the United Nations for 2001 and the amount that Congress is willing to pay. Turner's offer is intended to help Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, clinch a deal for a permanent reduction in the U.S. share of the U.N. budget and to bring an end to Washington's chronic debts to the world body, U.S. officials and a Turner representative said.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | Washington Post
The U.N. agency responsible for preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons is facing a financial crisis and may soon have to cease key operations because the United States and other countries refuse to pay their bills on time, according to senior diplomats here. The International Atomic Energy Agency, which seeks to ensure that no country--including U.S.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police stopped traffic for nearly a mile in the rain, a flock of Secret Service agents were ready to take a bullet, and the secretary-general of the United Nations stood at attention, all for the man who leads the world's biggest deadbeat nation. President Clinton still has plenty of political capital at the United Nations. But it has been 13 years since the U.S. began withholding its dues here in an attempt to force the U.N.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1998 | From Bloomberg Business News
The International Monetary Fund called on Congress to give it the money to help stem the slide of Latin American markets if necessary, warning that the U.S. can't turn away from its leadership of the world financial system. "There are decisions of enormous importance being made now about the role that the United States plans to take in the global economic system it created in 1945," Stanley Fischer, the IMF's first deputy managing director, said in remarks made public Sunday.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1998 | Associated Press
Much of the first money allocated from Ted Turner's $1-billion gift to the United Nations will go to the U.N. Population Fund, an agency known for being unpopular with Congress. Nearly $8 million will be earmarked for programs of the Population Fund, which has been attacked by conservative congressmen for supporting family planning. In the allocation, 42% of the money will go to women's programs.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill pledging to pay the United Nations most of what the United States owes--once hailed as a grand compromise between Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.)--is now languishing after unsuccessful negotiations between the Senate and the House.
NEWS
November 27, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
President Clinton on Wednesday signed the last two bills needed to fund the U.S. government in the current fiscal year, including a provision that will help illegal immigrants avoid deportation, but he complained that the bills do not offer money for an International Monetary Fund program or to pay off U.S. arrears to the United Nations. Clinton inked the $13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kofi Annan, the secretary-general of the United Nations, visited California in part to recruit celebrities to the cause of boosting the world organization. Much to his surprise, he found himself treated as a celebrity. Annan, on Tuesday in Los Angeles and in the Bay Area on Sunday and Monday, was hailed and stopped by passersby on the street and in hotel lobbies. Tourists in San Francisco leaned out of cable cars to snap his picture. He received standing ovations whenever he spoke.
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Clinton administration officials appealed to the House not to put antiabortion language in an $18-billion bill for the International Monetary Fund. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin told reporters that national security could be compromised if the bill does not pass.
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