Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Nations Foreign Aid
IN THE NEWS

United Nations Foreign Aid

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
With hundreds of Afghans dying of the cold in squalid camps, the United Nations pleaded for urgent international assistance. "The situation is desperate. Most Afghans have lost everything," Erick de Mul, the U.N. coordinator for Afghanistan, said in neighboring Pakistan. Drought and war have driven hundreds of thousands from their homes. In the western province of Herat, 80,000 people are living in six U.N. camps. About 155,000 Afghans are living in squalor in Pakistan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new chief of the United Nations refugee agency said Tuesday that he hopes to send as many as 1.5 million displaced Afghans back to their beleaguered homeland, a move that would require close cooperation with the Taliban regime and a sharp increase in aid to that pariah state.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new chief of the United Nations refugee agency said Tuesday that he hopes to send as many as 1.5 million displaced Afghans back to their beleaguered homeland, a move that would require close cooperation with the Taliban regime and a sharp increase in aid to that pariah state.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
With hundreds of Afghans dying of the cold in squalid camps, the United Nations pleaded for urgent international assistance. "The situation is desperate. Most Afghans have lost everything," Erick de Mul, the U.N. coordinator for Afghanistan, said in neighboring Pakistan. Drought and war have driven hundreds of thousands from their homes. In the western province of Herat, 80,000 people are living in six U.N. camps. About 155,000 Afghans are living in squalor in Pakistan.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the country's worst floods, at least 130 people drowned and up to 1,000 were reported homeless after a rain-swollen river raged through crowded Zulu townships and squatter camps near Pietermaritzburg, officials said Tuesday. Military and police rescue teams helped search for survivors and recovered bodies Tuesday afternoon in the Edendale Valley, a cluster of slum communities in KwaZulu-Natal province, about 240 miles southeast of Johannesburg.
WORLD
May 31, 2006 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
A special session of Afghanistan's parliament Tuesday called for the prosecution of U.S. troops involved in a fatal traffic accident that sparked hours of intense rioting here. "Those who are responsible for Monday's incident must be investigated and prosecuted," said a statement from the speaker of parliament's lower house, Younis Qanooni, which was read over state-run television Tuesday night.
WORLD
January 30, 2008 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Shattered glass has been replaced, debris swept away and guests have begun trickling back to the Serena Hotel more than two weeks after Taliban militants killed seven staff members and visitors, sending a shudder through Kabul's foreign community. The psychological damage is proving to be harder to repair.
WORLD
May 30, 2006 | Wesal Zaman and Paul Watson, Special to The Times
In the capital's worst unrest since the fall of the Taliban 4 1/2 years ago, Afghan mobs fought running battles Monday with troops and police trying to quell riots sparked when U.S. military vehicles fled the scene of a fatal accident. At least eight people were killed and more than 100 injured, most in the rioting that followed an early-morning traffic accident involving a convoy of U.S. military vehicles, Afghan officials said.
OPINION
September 8, 2002 | WALTER RUSSELL MEAD, Walter Russell Mead, a contributing editor to Opinion, is the author of "Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World."
The events of Sept. 11 precipitated one of the most dramatic periods in U.S. foreign policy since the early years of the Cold War. After President Bush summoned an aroused nation to a far-reaching, if ill-defined, "war on terror," U.S. troops and their allies toppled the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. Since then, they have committed themselves to what could become a dangerous, long-term military occupation of one of the poorest, most violent and most chaotic places on Earth. In much of the world, a wave of sympathy for the victims of the terrorist attacks has gradually yielded to apprehension about what many perceive as excessive U.S. combativeness and unilateralism--and especially about the Bush administration's determined support for "regime change" in Iraq.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2002 | Sonni Efron and Janet Hook, Times Staff Writers
In the Great Rolodex Reshuffle that takes place in this town after every election, one man's card has been moved to the front of the stack. It belongs to Sen. Richard G. Lugar, the 70-year-old Indiana Republican whose views are suddenly being sought by the White House and foreign emissaries. Lugar is due to take over next month as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, vowing to make it a more potent platform from which to advise, assist and nudge the Bush administration.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|