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NEWS
March 2, 2000 | By MAGGIE FARLEY,
The men who represent the two sides of the U.N. sanctions policy for Iraq--the incoming weapons inspector, whose investigations will shape the sanctions, and the outgoing humanitarian chief, who tried to ease them--said Wednesday that they are both searching for a better way. Hans Blix, the new top arms inspector for Iraq, said he will strive for a middle ground between alienating and appeasing Baghdad.
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NEWS
September 13, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright urged the United Nations on Tuesday to maintain economic sanctions against Iraq, dismissing as well-intentioned but misinformed some religious and human rights organizations that say the measures are starving the Iraqi people. "We must continue to do all we can to ease the hardships faced by Iraq's people," Albright said in what is expected was her final speech to the U.N. General Assembly.
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NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Security Council decided Friday to let Iraq spend more money to repair its oil industry--an investment intended to boost the amount of food and medicine Baghdad can buy through a U.N. humanitarian relief program. Iraqi Oil Minister Amir Mohammed Rashid Ubaydi welcomed the decision, which he called a victory for Iraq. "When good insists, . . . evil backs down," he said, speaking in Baghdad before the vote. All 15 ambassadors voted in favor of the U.S.-sponsored resolution without comment.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected reversal, Iran has opened its protected sea lanes to dozens of ships carrying illegal shipments of Iraqi oil in violation of U.N. sanctions on Saddam Hussein's government, U.S. officials said Monday. The Clinton administration considers the about-face alarming because oil smuggling is Hussein's only major source of independent income. U.S. officials have estimated that unfettered access to Iranian waters could generate as much as $1 billion for his regime this year.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resignations this week of two U.N. officials overseeing aid to Iraq have spotlighted the United Nations' conundrum in trying to make Baghdad play by the world's rules: Economic sanctions, the officials say, are enriching the country's elite while hurting the general population. And they no longer want to be part of it.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Iraq on Saturday rejected a new U.N. plan to restart weapons inspections, saying it was a no-go until the Security Council lifts the trade sanctions imposed nearly 10 years ago. Deputy Prime Minister Tarik Aziz said the government was not impressed by the U.N. Security Council's approval Thursday of the plan drawn up by chief weapons inspector Hans Blix.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright urged the United Nations on Tuesday to maintain economic sanctions against Iraq, dismissing as well-intentioned but misinformed some religious and human rights organizations that say the measures are starving the Iraqi people. "We must continue to do all we can to ease the hardships faced by Iraq's people," Albright said in what is expected was her final speech to the U.N. General Assembly.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected reversal, Iran has opened its protected sea lanes to dozens of ships carrying illegal shipments of Iraqi oil in violation of U.N. sanctions on Saddam Hussein's government, U.S. officials said Monday. The Clinton administration considers the about-face alarming because oil smuggling is Hussein's only major source of independent income. U.S. officials have estimated that unfettered access to Iranian waters could generate as much as $1 billion for his regime this year.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf said Wednesday that a United Nations ultimatum threatening force against Iraq could help undermine the morale of the Iraqi military and that he hopes to be prepared to launch an offensive as early as Jan. 15. "When that day comes and passes, then every day after that, tensions in Iraq should greatly increase," the commander, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, said in an interview.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Iraq on Saturday rejected a new U.N. plan to restart weapons inspections, saying it was a no-go until the Security Council lifts the trade sanctions imposed nearly 10 years ago. Deputy Prime Minister Tarik Aziz said the government was not impressed by the U.N. Security Council's approval Thursday of the plan drawn up by chief weapons inspector Hans Blix.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Security Council decided Friday to let Iraq spend more money to repair its oil industry--an investment intended to boost the amount of food and medicine Baghdad can buy through a U.N. humanitarian relief program. Iraqi Oil Minister Amir Mohammed Rashid Ubaydi welcomed the decision, which he called a victory for Iraq. "When good insists, . . . evil backs down," he said, speaking in Baghdad before the vote. All 15 ambassadors voted in favor of the U.S.-sponsored resolution without comment.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | By MAGGIE FARLEY,
The men who represent the two sides of the U.N. sanctions policy for Iraq--the incoming weapons inspector, whose investigations will shape the sanctions, and the outgoing humanitarian chief, who tried to ease them--said Wednesday that they are both searching for a better way. Hans Blix, the new top arms inspector for Iraq, said he will strive for a middle ground between alienating and appeasing Baghdad.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resignations this week of two U.N. officials overseeing aid to Iraq have spotlighted the United Nations' conundrum in trying to make Baghdad play by the world's rules: Economic sanctions, the officials say, are enriching the country's elite while hurting the general population. And they no longer want to be part of it.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf said Wednesday that a United Nations ultimatum threatening force against Iraq could help undermine the morale of the Iraqi military and that he hopes to be prepared to launch an offensive as early as Jan. 15. "When that day comes and passes, then every day after that, tensions in Iraq should greatly increase," the commander, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, said in an interview.
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