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NEWS
September 21, 1994 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali launched a priority search Tuesday for a successor to the United Nations' chief Haiti envoy, who has resigned and criticized the United States for a "total absence of consultations" in last-minute negotiations to persuade Haiti's army leaders to step down.
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NEWS
July 31, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Security Council extended the U.N. military and police force in Haiti for a final four months but cut its size. The council's resolution, adopted by a 15-0 vote, will reduce the international police force from 300 to 250 and cut the military from 500 to 50 headquarters staff paid for by all U.N. members. But Canada and Pakistan will again supplement the military force, this time with 650 Canadian soldiers and 350 Pakistanis. They are part of the U.N.
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NEWS
August 1, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sending a message to Haiti's military leaders that "it's time for them to leave," the U.N. Security Council approved a resolution Sunday permitting the use of force to restore democracy to the Caribbean nation. The 12-0 vote, with China and Brazil abstaining, provides the diplomatic cover for U.S.-led military action long threatened by President Clinton.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
President Rene Preval said Wednesday that he has asked the United Nations to extend its peacekeeping mission through July to give Haiti's new police force more training. The mission's current mandate ends Nov. 30. About 1,200 U.N. peacekeeping troops are in the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area. An additional 300 U.N. civilian police officers also are assigned to Haiti. In an October report, U.N.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | From Reuters
The isolation of this Caribbean nation from the outside world, at least by air, was complete Saturday as the last scheduled flight left Haiti. The Air France jet that took off in the early afternoon for the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe was the airline's last, bringing it into line with other carriers who stopped flying to Haiti late last month after President Clinton tightened sanctions against Haiti's military leaders.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conditions in Haiti will be stable and secure enough by the end of March to allow the Pentagon to hand over peacekeeping responsibilities there to the United Nations, Secretary of State Warren Christopher predicted Sunday. Although the U.N. forces will be commanded by a U.S.
NEWS
September 2, 1995 | Reuters
A French member of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Haiti was shot in the head by an unidentified assailant and critically wounded, U.N. sources said Friday. Marshall Christian Marginier, 36, a member of the U.N. civilian police force in the western town of Petit Goave, was preparing to go to bed when he was shot in the head Thursday night from a distance of about 10 yards, U.N. spokesman Eric Falt said. Marginier was flown to a hospital in Miami, he said. A U.N.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has decided to seek a U.N. Security Council resolution authorizing an invasion of Haiti by a U.S.-led multinational force to topple the military regime, officials said Wednesday. At the same time, the Administration plans to back up the threat by lining up units for an invasion force of as many as 15,000 troops--most of them American, but as many as 3,000 from other countries. U.S.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Talks on restoring democracy to Haiti appeared in trouble on their second day Monday, and sources close to the talks said military leaders appeared intransigent and determined to retain some power. Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras was pressing to retain control of the security forces when civilian rule is restored, said the sources, speaking on condition of anonymity. Cedras insisted on retaining his status as army commander when President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returns to the country, sources said.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deposed Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and his nemesis, army commander Raoul Cedras, shared a small island off Manhattan but did not meet Sunday as formal and intricate negotiations began for a transfer of power back to Aristide. Special U.N. mediator Dante Caputo, the French-educated former Argentine foreign minister, served as the intermediary between Aristide and the general who ousted him.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to keep peacekeepers in Haiti for at least five more months, but it reduced the size of the force at China's insistence. China has called for an end to the mission, saying it is no longer needed. Diplomats said Beijing was threatening a veto to punish Haiti for having diplomatic ties to Taiwan, which China considers a renegade province. The resolution replaces the current force of 1,200 peacekeepers, backed by 700 Canadian soldiers, with 600 U.N.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with .45s, high school diplomas and four months of U.N. training, members of the year-old Haitian civilian police force are tested daily on the dusty streets of the sprawling Cite Soleil slum. Gang members with AK-47s could lurk in any shack. The bulging pocket on any passerby's torn pants could hide a .357 magnum. "People here just laugh at us and our little handguns," said one nervous young officer, returning to the new concrete-block station house after a foot patrol.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Francois Denis Gbetie, 36, a U.N. police officer from Benin, became the first member of the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Haiti to be killed by hostile fire, the United Nations said. Gbetie was driving with another Beninese officer in Port-au-Prince when several gunmen opened fired on his vehicle. The slain officer's colleague was unharmed. A suspect was arrested.
NEWS
January 26, 1996 | Reuters
A U.N. peacekeeper from Bangladesh who was hit by a truck Monday has died from his injuries, the third foreign soldier serving in Haiti to die in a week, U.N. officials said Thursday. Lance Corp. Abdur Rahim, 29, was hit as he chased after a suspect near the Port-au-Prince airport. On Sunday, a Pakistani peacekeeper was found dead in an apparent suicide, and last week a soldier from Guyana gunned down another Guyanese soldier after a dispute.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although all U.S. troops will pull out of the country by the end of February, Haiti is asking for other elements of the U.N. peacekeeping mission to remain for six more months because its new police force is still not ready to maintain order. The request for an extension came from the office of President-elect Rene Preval a week ago, after U.S. officials testified before Congress that they suspect some members of the police force of taking part in political violence.
NEWS
November 25, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-year-old Jean-Claude Jeslin, taking a break from rebuilding the hurricane-wrecked bridge that links his modest coastal village to a road on the southern end of this poverty-plagued country, ponders life next year after U.S. and U.N. troops go home. "There will be no more work, no more jobs," Jeslin declared, taking on the role of spokesman for half a dozen Haitian workers who have been helping U.S. Army engineers with the project. How will Jeslin--and Haiti--get along?
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A successful outcome to the crucial talks beginning Sunday in New York between exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the man who ousted him, Gen. Raoul Cedras, depends almost entirely on a serious policy change by Aristide, according to diplomats and other experts. "The only chance for a settlement is for Aristide to back off from his demands for an immediate resignation by Cedras and an acceptance of a new government in place before he returns," a European diplomat said.
NEWS
April 16, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiations to end Haiti's long-running political and economic crisis were being pushed to the very last minute as the country's ruling military declined Thursday to respond to a final proposal by U.N. special envoy Dante Caputo. In a 90-minute session Wednesday night, Caputo delivered a letter to the military commander, Gen. Raoul Cedras, outlining a program that would bring back democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, ousted in a coup in September, 1991.
NEWS
September 2, 1995 | Reuters
A French member of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Haiti was shot in the head by an unidentified assailant and critically wounded, U.N. sources said Friday. Marshall Christian Marginier, 36, a member of the U.N. civilian police force in the western town of Petit Goave, was preparing to go to bed when he was shot in the head Thursday night from a distance of about 10 yards, U.N. spokesman Eric Falt said. Marginier was flown to a hospital in Miami, he said. A U.N.
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned that violence in Haiti may escalate now that the U.S. military mission has turned over its peacekeeping role to the United Nations, the Pentagon has warned U.N. and Haitian security forces that more than 20 "potentially at-risk people" could be targeted for assassination, senior Defense Department sources said Thursday. The list of possible victims, the majority of whom have been identified as political opponents of reinstated President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, has been compiled by U.S.
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