Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Nations Honduras
IN THE NEWS

United Nations Honduras

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | United Press International
A special U.N. panel confirmed Washington's charge that Nicaraguan forces crossed into Honduras last month in pursuit of the U.S.-backed Contras, officials said Thursday. In a report to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar in New York, investigators said "it was acknowledged" that the Nicaraguan forces penetrated Honduran territory by more than 2 miles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Thursday bluntly told self-appointed negotiators trying to cut a deal for the release of American hostages in Lebanon to "butt out." Speaking to a news conference at the United Nations, Shultz insisted that the United States has not engaged in direct talks with Iran about the nine American hostages or any other subject. And, he reiterated, the Reagan Administration will make no deal to get the hostages out.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar on Monday named a four-member fact-finding mission to visit the Nicaraguan-Honduran border zone where Sandinista troops were reported to have clashed with Contras inside Honduras last week. The mission will leave New York today and return next weekend. Leading the group will be Gilberto Schlittler Silva, a Brazilian who is director-designate of Security Council affairs in the U.N. Secretariat.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | United Press International
A special U.N. panel confirmed Washington's charge that Nicaraguan forces crossed into Honduras last month in pursuit of the U.S.-backed Contras, officials said Thursday. In a report to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar in New York, investigators said "it was acknowledged" that the Nicaraguan forces penetrated Honduran territory by more than 2 miles.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Nicaragua, bringing accusations against the United States before the U.N. Security Council for the 15th time, accused the Reagan Administration on Friday of "laying the ground for possible direct intervention" following clashes this week between Sandinista troops and Contra forces along the border with Honduras. U.S. Ambassador Herbert S. Okun rejected the charges, asserting that the Sandinista regime conducted a "planned offensive" against neighboring Honduras, aimed at destroying the Contras.
NEWS
October 7, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Thursday bluntly told self-appointed negotiators trying to cut a deal for the release of American hostages in Lebanon to "butt out." Speaking to a news conference at the United Nations, Shultz insisted that the United States has not engaged in direct talks with Iran about the nine American hostages or any other subject. And, he reiterated, the Reagan Administration will make no deal to get the hostages out.
NEWS
January 17, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
In a dramatic move to end six years of guerrilla war, the Nicaraguan government suspended a state of emergency Saturday and offered for the first time to hold face-to-face peace talks with the U.S.-backed Contras. Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega announced the concessions after a summit meeting at which the four other Central American presidents threatened to censure his Sandinista government for failure to comply with the terms of their regional peace agreement.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar on Monday named a four-member fact-finding mission to visit the Nicaraguan-Honduran border zone where Sandinista troops were reported to have clashed with Contras inside Honduras last week. The mission will leave New York today and return next weekend. Leading the group will be Gilberto Schlittler Silva, a Brazilian who is director-designate of Security Council affairs in the U.N. Secretariat.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Nicaragua, bringing accusations against the United States before the U.N. Security Council for the 15th time, accused the Reagan Administration on Friday of "laying the ground for possible direct intervention" following clashes this week between Sandinista troops and Contra forces along the border with Honduras. U.S. Ambassador Herbert S. Okun rejected the charges, asserting that the Sandinista regime conducted a "planned offensive" against neighboring Honduras, aimed at destroying the Contras.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|