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OPINION
January 20, 2003
It sounds like a punch line but unfortunately it isn't. As of today, Najat Hajjaji, who represents Moammar Kadafi's Libya, is chairwoman of the United Nations Human Rights Commission. What makes this possible is the U.N. regional rotation system for leadership of the commission that leaves the choice purely to nations in each region. Last year it was Europe's turn, and its delegates to the commission unremarkably chose Poland. This year, African members chose Libya.
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WORLD
June 23, 2006 | Kasra Naji, Special to The Times
Journalists and human rights activists in Iran joined their counterparts abroad Thursday in condemning the inclusion of a hard-line prosecutor on the country's delegation to the first session of the U.N. Human Rights Council. "This is an insult to the Iranian people, and questions the credibility" of the new panel, said Issa Saharkhiz, a leading member of the Assn. for the Freedom of the Press.
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NEWS
August 14, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations Human Rights Commission on Thursday opened a two-day emergency session to investigate atrocity reports in Bosnia-Herzegovina, with U.S. and Serbian envoys trading accusations of "fascist" behavior by their respective countries. Assistant Secretary of State John R.
WORLD
April 13, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations Commission on Human Rights called for combating defamation of religions, especially Islam, and condemned discrimination against Muslims in the West's fight against terrorism. The 53-member forum adopted a resolution, presented by Pakistan on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, deploring what it called the intensification of defamation of Muslims after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision that is becoming something of an annual tradition, the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Tuesday rejected a Clinton administration resolution that sought to condemn China for political and religious repression. The commission, meeting in Geneva, voted 22 to 18, with 12 abstentions, to take no action on the issue this year. In 1999, the vote was strikingly similar: 22 to 17, with 14 abstentions. Although U.S. officials acknowledge that they had no realistic hope that the U.N.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States was voted off the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Thursday, marking the first time since the world body's inception more than five decades ago that the Americans will not hold a seat. "It was an election, understandably, where we're very disappointed," said acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham. "This won't at all, of course, affect our commitment to human rights issues in and outside of the United Nations. We'll continue to pursue them." In a surprise result, the U.S.
WORLD
April 13, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations Commission on Human Rights called for combating defamation of religions, especially Islam, and condemned discrimination against Muslims in the West's fight against terrorism. The 53-member forum adopted a resolution, presented by Pakistan on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, deploring what it called the intensification of defamation of Muslims after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States.
WORLD
July 23, 2002 | WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A career U.N. diplomat from Brazil will be named the U.N. human rights chief today, replacing Mary Robinson, the outspoken former Irish president who rankled the United States with her persistent questioning of its counter-terrorism tactics and angered China and Russia by condemning their suppression of separatists. The nomination of Sergio Vieira de Mello, a 54-year-old Brazilian who has served in a succession of U.N.
WORLD
April 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States called on the United Nations' top human rights body to condemn "ethnic cleansing" of blacks in Sudan's Darfur region, comparing it to Rwanda's genocide. The U.N. Human Rights Commission is to take up the issue today, but U.S. Ambassador Richard Williamson expressed concern that the wording of a planned resolution was too weak. U.N. human rights investigators have accused Sudanese government troops and Arab militias of rape, torture and slayings of blacks in Darfur.
WORLD
May 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States walked out of a U.N. meeting to protest a decision minutes later to give Sudan a third term on the Human Rights Commission, the world body's human rights watchdog. The U.S. ambassador to the commission, Sichan Siv, called the vote an "absurdity" and accused Sudan of massive human rights violations and "ethnic cleansing" in the western Darfur region before walking out of the Economic and Social Council chamber. Sudan's deputy U.N.
WORLD
May 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States walked out of a U.N. meeting to protest a decision minutes later to give Sudan a third term on the Human Rights Commission, the world body's human rights watchdog. The U.S. ambassador to the commission, Sichan Siv, called the vote an "absurdity" and accused Sudan of massive human rights violations and "ethnic cleansing" in the western Darfur region before walking out of the Economic and Social Council chamber. Sudan's deputy U.N.
WORLD
April 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States called on the United Nations' top human rights body to condemn "ethnic cleansing" of blacks in Sudan's Darfur region, comparing it to Rwanda's genocide. The U.N. Human Rights Commission is to take up the issue today, but U.S. Ambassador Richard Williamson expressed concern that the wording of a planned resolution was too weak. U.N. human rights investigators have accused Sudanese government troops and Arab militias of rape, torture and slayings of blacks in Darfur.
WORLD
April 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The top U.N. human rights watchdog passed resolutions criticizing conditions in Cuba and North Korea, but Russia and China avoided censure. The 53-nation U.N. Human Rights Commission voted 22 to 21 for a resolution that "deplored" Cuba's imprisonment of 75 dissidents arrested in March 2003. The commission voted 29 to 8 to condemn North Korea for its precarious humanitarian situation and for rights violations.
WORLD
January 21, 2003 | From Associated Press
The United Nations' human rights watchdog group elected a Libyan diplomat Monday as this year's president, overriding objections from the United States that the North African country's "horrible" record disqualifies it for such a post. Riding a wave of African solidarity, Najat Hajjaji received votes from 33 countries in her bid to head the 53-member U.N. Human Rights Commission for its annual session starting in March.
OPINION
January 20, 2003
It sounds like a punch line but unfortunately it isn't. As of today, Najat Hajjaji, who represents Moammar Kadafi's Libya, is chairwoman of the United Nations Human Rights Commission. What makes this possible is the U.N. regional rotation system for leadership of the commission that leaves the choice purely to nations in each region. Last year it was Europe's turn, and its delegates to the commission unremarkably chose Poland. This year, African members chose Libya.
WORLD
July 23, 2002 | WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A career U.N. diplomat from Brazil will be named the U.N. human rights chief today, replacing Mary Robinson, the outspoken former Irish president who rankled the United States with her persistent questioning of its counter-terrorism tactics and angered China and Russia by condemning their suppression of separatists. The nomination of Sergio Vieira de Mello, a 54-year-old Brazilian who has served in a succession of U.N.
WORLD
January 21, 2003 | From Associated Press
The United Nations' human rights watchdog group elected a Libyan diplomat Monday as this year's president, overriding objections from the United States that the North African country's "horrible" record disqualifies it for such a post. Riding a wave of African solidarity, Najat Hajjaji received votes from 33 countries in her bid to head the 53-member U.N. Human Rights Commission for its annual session starting in March.
WORLD
June 23, 2006 | Kasra Naji, Special to The Times
Journalists and human rights activists in Iran joined their counterparts abroad Thursday in condemning the inclusion of a hard-line prosecutor on the country's delegation to the first session of the U.N. Human Rights Council. "This is an insult to the Iranian people, and questions the credibility" of the new panel, said Issa Saharkhiz, a leading member of the Assn. for the Freedom of the Press.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration admitted Friday that the United States had lost its seat on the U.N. Human Rights Commission this week after receiving "solid, written assurances" of support from 43 countries in advance--only to get just 29 votes during the secret ballot. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said he was astonished and disappointed at the outcome, ending more than half a century in which the United States was the moral anchor of a group co-founded by former U.N.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States was voted off the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Thursday, marking the first time since the world body's inception more than five decades ago that the Americans will not hold a seat. "It was an election, understandably, where we're very disappointed," said acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham. "This won't at all, of course, affect our commitment to human rights issues in and outside of the United Nations. We'll continue to pursue them." In a surprise result, the U.S.
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