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NEWS
August 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
After four years of negotiations, the United Nations and Indonesia have signed an agreement to allow human rights observers access to the troubled region of East Timor. Observers are to be given access to all regions of Indonesia, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a statement in Geneva. "This is understood to include facilitating access to East Timor."
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NEWS
May 5, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a mob of angry Indonesian militia members attacked a U.N. office in West Timor last September, Julius Naisama was in the lead. First he encountered Pero Simundza, an aid worker from Croatia, and stabbed him in the stomach, prosecutors told an Indonesian court. Then he came across Carlos Caceres, an American, and stabbed him too, they said. On Friday, Naisama was convicted of conspiring to foment violence for his part in the attack that claimed the lives of three foreign aid workers.
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NEWS
July 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
A U.N. official urged Indonesian security forces Thursday to do more to keep the peace in East Timor ahead of next month's emotion-charged independence referendum. Ian Martin, the U.N. mission chief in East Timor, warned that "a significant improvement in the security situation" was necessary before the vote on the troubled province's future could be held Aug. 21 or 22. In New York, meanwhile, the United Nations opened another round of talks to discuss plans for a U.N.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | Associated Press
A notorious militia leader wanted by the United Nations for crimes committed in East Timor was sentenced Monday by an Indonesian court to six months in prison for weapons offenses. The verdict against Eurico Guterres is likely to anger U.N. officials and human rights campaigners who want Indonesia to prosecute those responsible for the destruction of much of East Timor.
NEWS
November 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
Armed independence fighters broke their pledge not to enter East Timor's capital, arriving in Dili on Friday and briefly blocking the commander of a multinational peacekeeping force from a U.N. compound. But the guerrillas' breach of their agreement with the international force will not hurt ties with the U.N. mission in East Timor, said Sergio Vieira de Mello, the United Nations' chief envoy here.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary-General Kofi Annan presented a blueprint Tuesday to guide East Timor to independence, a difficult task that the U.N. chief said will take two to three years and require a "robust" military and police presence. The U.N. plans call for building governmental institutions in the territory, which is seeking independence from Indonesia, in part based on the model that the world organization is following to create a civilian administration in Kosovo.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
United Nations peacekeepers extended their presence into the troubled western region of East Timor on Friday in a effort to rid the area of the armed militias that have wrought havoc for the past month. The peacekeeping force sent 700 soldiers into East Timor's wild west, where the instability has continued in part because the area abuts the Indonesian province of West Timor, which militias have used as a base. Since the first elements of the Australian-led force arrived in East Timor on Sept.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Security Council voted unanimously to authorize the United Nations to take control of East Timor during its transition to independence and to deploy more than 9,000 U.N. peacekeepers there. The U.N. will take over the administration of East Timor, probably for two or three years, to rebuild its shattered infrastructure and set its 800,000 people on the road to democracy before independence from Indonesia is declared. U.N.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | DAVID LAMB and MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Indonesian troops here were placed on high alert Tuesday in anticipation of a U.N. Security Council vote creating an Australian-led peacekeeping force for East Timor, Western military sources said.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the mile-high mountains above East Timor's capital, amid thick forests and craggy ravines, 40,000 refugees have waited for nearly a month in resignation, wondering if it will ever again be safe for them to go home. They can see the city of Dili far below them, spread out on a plain by the sea. And off to the east, they can see a towering statue of Jesus Christ, his arms spread as though in welcome to the nine gray Australian warships on the smooth turquoise water.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | From Reuters
Indonesia has set out a timetable for disarming gangs terrorizing East Timorese refugees, aid workers and U.N. peacekeepers, but it has rejected a Security Council mission to Jakarta to discuss the crisis. Gen.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Worried by escalating militia violence, the United Nations has granted its peacekeepers in East Timor the right to shoot at armed militiamen without warning, a U.N. official said. U.N. peacekeeper Capt. Isabelito Sanchez of the Philippine army said the world body had changed its rules of engagement in the troubled territory because of an increase in militia sightings.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia rejected a U.N. Security Council plan to dispatch a mission to Indonesia and East Timor to investigate the resurgence of militia activity against U.N. workers and civilians, the Defense Ministry said. A mob of militiamen and supporters attacked an office of the U.N. refugee agency in the West Timor border town of Atambua last week, killing three foreign staffers and prompting about 400 aid workers to flee the Indonesian province.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The angry militia members carried the headless corpse of their leader through the town of Atambua, looking for revenge. After a year of living in squalid refugee camps in the province of West Timor and surviving on handouts from the United Nations, they knew right where to go: the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. A mob of 6,000 gathered outside and screamed for the death of foreigners--any foreigners, one witness said.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing more attacks after the mob killing of three foreign aid workers, the United Nations evacuated its remaining relief staff from West Timor on Thursday, leaving about 90,000 refugees without international assistance. The Indonesian government, pledging to assert control in the troubled region, said 15 people had been arrested in Wednesday's slayings of the aid workers.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Indonesian mob, angry over the death of a notorious militia leader, stormed a U.N. building in West Timor on Wednesday and killed at least three foreign aid workers, authorities said. Pro-Indonesian militia members and their supporters hauled the bodies into the street and set them on fire before a crowd of thousands of people armed with machetes and homemade rifles, witnesses said. Four U.N.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | Associated Press
A notorious militia leader wanted by the United Nations for crimes committed in East Timor was sentenced Monday by an Indonesian court to six months in prison for weapons offenses. The verdict against Eurico Guterres is likely to anger U.N. officials and human rights campaigners who want Indonesia to prosecute those responsible for the destruction of much of East Timor.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said that it was suspending operations in West Timor after three of its workers were severely injured in an attack by pro-Indonesian militias. The anti-independence militia gangs have also set up roadblocks in the Indonesian province to stop refugees from returning home to East Timor, said U.N. refugee agency spokesman Jake Morland, adding that Indonesia's military was doing nothing to stop the rising tensions in the region.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Trevor Rees-Jones, the bodyguard who survived the car crash that killed Britain's Princess Diana, has accepted a job with the United Nations in East Timor, his lawyer said in London. Rees-Jones, a former paratrooper, was appointed deputy head of security in the town of Suai, attorney Ian Lucas said. He arrived in Timor on Aug. 4. Since the Aug. 31, 1997, accident, the 32-year-old Rees-Jones has remained mostly quiet about the events of that day, though he did write a book.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said that it was suspending operations in West Timor after three of its workers were severely injured in an attack by pro-Indonesian militias. The anti-independence militia gangs have also set up roadblocks in the Indonesian province to stop refugees from returning home to East Timor, said U.N. refugee agency spokesman Jake Morland, adding that Indonesia's military was doing nothing to stop the rising tensions in the region.
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