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United Nations Iraq

NEWS
June 30, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq appears to have rebuilt much of the conventional weapons complex that the allies destroyed during the Persian Gulf War and could well revive its nuclear bomb-making capability as well if the United Nations eases its sanctions, Congress was told Tuesday. The assessment came in separate, sometimes conflicting, assessments from Robert L.
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NEWS
January 18, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. warships, acting two years to the day after the outbreak of the Persian Gulf War, unleashed a barrage of 40 Tomahawk cruise missiles at a nuclear fabricating plant on the outskirts of Baghdad on Sunday in a continuing effort to force Saddam Hussein to comply with U.N. resolutions.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The U.N. Security Council on Friday unanimously approved a Persian Gulf peace mission by Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, and the Reagan Administration emphasized that the mission should be limited solely to obtaining Iran's definitive answer to a cease-fire proposal in the 7-year-old Iran-Iraq War.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | From Reuters
The U.N. Security Council adopted a strong resolution Thursday condemning Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, with several diplomats expressing alarm at what they considered a blatant danger to peace and security in the Middle East. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar and several council members said everyone was waiting to see what action the Arab League, meeting in Cairo, would take.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The volatile confrontation between Iraq and the United Nations intensified again Thursday as Baghdad announced that its presidential sites would remain off limits to U.N. weapons inspectors despite President Saddam Hussein's promise to allow foreign diplomats and experts inside.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | ART PINE and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The confrontation between the United Nations and Iraq moved further toward a climax, possibly this weekend, as the Security Council on Friday awaited Baghdad's response to a proposed compromise over Iraq's refusal to let U.N. weapons inspectors enter its Agriculture Ministry building. After a day of more diplomatic churning by all sides, Iraq's U.N.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allied forces missed roughly half the intended targets in their strike on Iraq, according to a Pentagon assessment Thursday. But Bush Administration officials declared the mission a success because of the political message it sent to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams said Wednesday's attack "blew up parts" of four air-defense sites that had served as Baghdad's eyes and ears in the south but left three mobile air-defense missiles there intact.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laying the groundwork for an official cease-fire in the Persian Gulf War, the Iraqi military agreed Sunday to an "immediate" exchange of all prisoners of war and to help locate its mines and booby-traps in Kuwait and the Persian Gulf, said Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, the U.S. commander in chief. He described the more than two hours of cease-fire talks here as "a major step forward in the cause of peace."
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.N. Security Council, angered by Iraq's rebuff of a special U.N. envoy, began to consider new measures Monday to prod Baghdad into allowing arms inspections. The move could bring a new confrontation with Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. Members of the 15-nation council launched formal "consultations" to sound out key governments on how far the organization should go in enforcing this and other U.N. resolutions involving Iraq.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush vowed Tuesday not to permit "the suffering of innocent women and children" in war-ravaged Iraq, and the White House said it is considering the possibility of allowing the country to sell oil to buy food and medicine. The possible oil sales, urged by the head of a special United Nations commission, would loosen a postwar U.S. policy that has kept an economic noose around Iraq while insisting that Saddam Hussein's government can afford to buy the relief supplies it needs.
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