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February 19, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite four days of rebuffs, Boutros Boutros-Ghali on Thursday wound up the first visit to Japan by a United Nations' secretary general in 11 years by reiterating calls for Japan to play a larger role in U.N. peacekeeping missions. "If you are an important country, you have important responsibilities," he told reporters at the Japan National Press Club. "And Japan is a great power, a major country.
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NEWS
July 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder pressed Japan on Friday to ratify the Kyoto treaty, arguing that the Asian nation has a "special responsibility" as the country where the global warming accord was born. The 1997 agreement faces an important test at talks in Bonn next week. The position of Japan, the world's second-largest economy, has become pivotal to its survival.
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NEWS
January 29, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa will quietly launch an effort to win a permanent seat for Japan on the U.N. Security Council when he attends a one-day meeting this week of leaders from the 15 countries that currently hold seats on the council, according to Foreign Ministry officials. The effort will be so low-key that it might not even attract public notice, the officials say.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a crucial push from the United States, the U.N. is about to tackle the tough issue of expanding the 15-member Security Council, the most powerful single agency in the world body. If the changes go through, Germany, Japan and three or more nations from the developing world will join the U.S., Britain, China, France and Russia as permanent members of the council.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder pressed Japan on Friday to ratify the Kyoto treaty, arguing that the Asian nation has a "special responsibility" as the country where the global warming accord was born. The 1997 agreement faces an important test at talks in Bonn next week. The position of Japan, the world's second-largest economy, has become pivotal to its survival.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | Associated Press
In a meticulously organized minuet of diplomacy Thursday, Japanese royalty visited the United Nations, where their country aspires to a permanent seat on the Security Council. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, who favors Japan's membership on the council, greeted Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko at U.N. headquarters. During the visit, there was no discussion of Japan's goal of permanent membership in the most powerful U.N. body, the 15-nation Security Council.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a crucial push from the United States, the U.N. is about to tackle the tough issue of expanding the 15-member Security Council, the most powerful single agency in the world body. If the changes go through, Germany, Japan and three or more nations from the developing world will join the U.S., Britain, China, France and Russia as permanent members of the council.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan is considering sending thousands of people to the Middle East to take part in the multinational effort against Iraq and debating whether to include members of the armed forces, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Friday. No decision is expected soon, the spokesman, Taizo Watanabe, told reporters.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu outlined draft legislation Thursday for a U.N. Peace Cooperation Corps that, if approved by Parliament, could provide a structure for sending Japanese military personnel to the Persian Gulf or to other international trouble spots. The measure provides that any troops used in this way would remove their military uniforms and assume noncombat duties under civilian control. They probably would not carry guns.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | From Times Staff Writers
President Bush appealed to Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama on Monday to provide more help for the United States in the Persian Gulf, but Nakayama offered no new financial commitments beyond Japan's pledge last fall of nearly $2 billion. During a half-hour meeting at the White House, the President "strongly urged Japan to provide the maximum cooperation possible," according to a statement by White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | Associated Press
In a meticulously organized minuet of diplomacy Thursday, Japanese royalty visited the United Nations, where their country aspires to a permanent seat on the Security Council. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, who favors Japan's membership on the council, greeted Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko at U.N. headquarters. During the visit, there was no discussion of Japan's goal of permanent membership in the most powerful U.N. body, the 15-nation Security Council.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When this country sent troops to participate in the U.N. peacekeeping operations in Cambodia last fall, the Japanese took pride in having made a major stride toward fulfilling their responsibilities as a world power. Many believed that Japan no longer could be accused of ducking its duties by contributing only money, as it had during the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
February 19, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite four days of rebuffs, Boutros Boutros-Ghali on Thursday wound up the first visit to Japan by a United Nations' secretary general in 11 years by reiterating calls for Japan to play a larger role in U.N. peacekeeping missions. "If you are an important country, you have important responsibilities," he told reporters at the Japan National Press Club. "And Japan is a great power, a major country.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | From Reuters
Japan's ruling party terminated a marathon debate early today on a bill to allow troops to act as U.N. peacekeepers abroad and pushed the measure through a stormy session of a key parliamentary committee. The opposition Socialists and Communists had refused to take part in the vote by the special upper house committee, saying the measure violated the constitution and required more debate.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa will quietly launch an effort to win a permanent seat for Japan on the U.N. Security Council when he attends a one-day meeting this week of leaders from the 15 countries that currently hold seats on the council, according to Foreign Ministry officials. The effort will be so low-key that it might not even attract public notice, the officials say.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | From Times Staff Writers
President Bush appealed to Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama on Monday to provide more help for the United States in the Persian Gulf, but Nakayama offered no new financial commitments beyond Japan's pledge last fall of nearly $2 billion. During a half-hour meeting at the White House, the President "strongly urged Japan to provide the maximum cooperation possible," according to a statement by White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita told Parliament on Friday that Japan will formulate a new five-year defense plan beginning in 1991 that will call for a moderate increase in military spending despite "a new current" in international relations. It was the first time that Takeshita had clarified Japan's intention to continue expanding defense spending after the present build-up ends.
NEWS
September 13, 1988
The United States and several of its allies have asked U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar to send an investigative team to Iraq to determine if the Iraqi military used poison gas against Kurdish guerrillas, diplomats told the New York Times. The request, made by the United States, Britain, West Germany and Japan, asks the U.N. team to seek evidence of chemical warfare in the mountainous Kurdish region and in Turkey, where thousands of Kurdish refugees have fled.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu outlined draft legislation Thursday for a U.N. Peace Cooperation Corps that, if approved by Parliament, could provide a structure for sending Japanese military personnel to the Persian Gulf or to other international trouble spots. The measure provides that any troops used in this way would remove their military uniforms and assume noncombat duties under civilian control. They probably would not carry guns.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan is considering sending thousands of people to the Middle East to take part in the multinational effort against Iraq and debating whether to include members of the armed forces, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Friday. No decision is expected soon, the spokesman, Taizo Watanabe, told reporters.
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