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NEWS
March 2, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein, reaching out to both Iraq and Kuwait, called Friday for postwar unity among the Arabs and warned of "painful memories which can be transformed into hatred and rancor if they are allowed to grow and fester." "I do not propose to go into the details of the sad drama because you know it too well. You have lived it," he said of the Persian Gulf crisis that divided Arab countries into hostile camps.
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NEWS
March 2, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Hussein, reaching out to both Iraq and Kuwait, called Friday for postwar unity among the Arabs and warned of "painful memories which can be transformed into hatred and rancor if they are allowed to grow and fester." "I do not propose to go into the details of the sad drama because you know it too well. You have lived it," he said of the Persian Gulf crisis that divided Arab countries into hostile camps.
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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council urged Wednesday night that Jordan be given emergency financial aid to cushion the impact of U.N. sanctions against Iraq. Both Jordan and Bulgaria pleaded for relief from the embargo in what was expected to be only the first of many requests from countries claiming to be hard hit by the embargo imposed after Iraq's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar condemned allied BOMBING RAIDS on the highway from Baghdad to Amman, the main thoroughfare for refugees fleeing Iraq to Jordan. He called Jordan "an innocent victim" of the Gulf War. The State Department said Jordanian truck drivers are using the highway to break the U.N. trade embargo. It also accused Iraq of mingling military equipment with civilian convoys. IRAQ accused the U.N. chief of remaining silent while the allies bomb Iraqi civilians.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An icy wind blew through the director's tent as Thaher Hadid spoke of the prospect of a human disaster looming just beyond his desert outpost, a mass of 1,548 mostly vacant canvas tents known as Azraq I evacuation camp. Here, he explained during the weekend, more than 1 million Asians, Egyptians, Sudanese and other Third World workers fleeing Kuwait after Iraq's invasion took refuge after Aug. 2, stretching the compassion of Hadid's nation and the rest of the world last fall.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with angry outcries, the United Nations on Thursday acknowledged shortcomings in the distribution of relief to tens of thousands of refugees stranded in Jordan, but a prominent U.S. relief official predicted that the worst problems will be overcome in a couple of weeks.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before dawn Tuesday, a cargo plane from the United States brought 500 tents to Jordan. Along with another 500 brought in from a U.N. warehouse in Italy, they were trucked to a stretch of desert near Jordan's frontier with Iraq. By this afternoon, the 1,000 tents should be bursting with refugees from Kuwait and Iraq. But by then, another 5,000 or 10,000 or 20,000 new refugees will have streamed into Jordan from Iraq with nothing to eat or drink and nowhere to sleep.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Jordan took its first public, if tentative, step Thursday toward complying with a U.N. trade embargo on Iraq by asking for $2 billion in compensation for direct and indirect costs of cutting off commerce with its next-door neighbor. The United Nations set up a special committee in New York to consider Jordan's request for aid. "Jordan is a special case and needs particular help," said Crispin Tickell, the British ambassador to the United Nations, in a report from New York.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International relief officials Saturday proclaimed a virtual end to the two-month refugee crisis in Jordan while they begin to make plans for potentially larger numbers of refugees should war break out in the Persian Gulf. There were still about 37,000 Asian refugees in well-ordered tent encampments in Jordan, but they are being moved out at the rate of about 7,000 a day, representatives of the U.N. Disaster Relief Office (UNDRO) said Saturday.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar condemned allied BOMBING RAIDS on the highway from Baghdad to Amman, the main thoroughfare for refugees fleeing Iraq to Jordan. He called Jordan "an innocent victim" of the Gulf War. The State Department said Jordanian truck drivers are using the highway to break the U.N. trade embargo. It also accused Iraq of mingling military equipment with civilian convoys. IRAQ accused the U.N. chief of remaining silent while the allies bomb Iraqi civilians.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An icy wind blew through the director's tent as Thaher Hadid spoke of the prospect of a human disaster looming just beyond his desert outpost, a mass of 1,548 mostly vacant canvas tents known as Azraq I evacuation camp. Here, he explained during the weekend, more than 1 million Asians, Egyptians, Sudanese and other Third World workers fleeing Kuwait after Iraq's invasion took refuge after Aug. 2, stretching the compassion of Hadid's nation and the rest of the world last fall.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International relief officials Saturday proclaimed a virtual end to the two-month refugee crisis in Jordan while they begin to make plans for potentially larger numbers of refugees should war break out in the Persian Gulf. There were still about 37,000 Asian refugees in well-ordered tent encampments in Jordan, but they are being moved out at the rate of about 7,000 a day, representatives of the U.N. Disaster Relief Office (UNDRO) said Saturday.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with angry outcries, the United Nations on Thursday acknowledged shortcomings in the distribution of relief to tens of thousands of refugees stranded in Jordan, but a prominent U.S. relief official predicted that the worst problems will be overcome in a couple of weeks.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before dawn Tuesday, a cargo plane from the United States brought 500 tents to Jordan. Along with another 500 brought in from a U.N. warehouse in Italy, they were trucked to a stretch of desert near Jordan's frontier with Iraq. By this afternoon, the 1,000 tents should be bursting with refugees from Kuwait and Iraq. But by then, another 5,000 or 10,000 or 20,000 new refugees will have streamed into Jordan from Iraq with nothing to eat or drink and nowhere to sleep.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Jordan took its first public, if tentative, step Thursday toward complying with a U.N. trade embargo on Iraq by asking for $2 billion in compensation for direct and indirect costs of cutting off commerce with its next-door neighbor. The United Nations set up a special committee in New York to consider Jordan's request for aid. "Jordan is a special case and needs particular help," said Crispin Tickell, the British ambassador to the United Nations, in a report from New York.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council urged Wednesday night that Jordan be given emergency financial aid to cushion the impact of U.N. sanctions against Iraq. Both Jordan and Bulgaria pleaded for relief from the embargo in what was expected to be only the first of many requests from countries claiming to be hard hit by the embargo imposed after Iraq's Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait.
OPINION
November 29, 2003
Re "Burdens on Peace: Fences and Arafat's Empty Words," letters, Nov. 24: Bruce Friedman asks, "What will Israel receive in return [for removing the settlements]?" First, Israeli soldiers won't have to guard the settlements anymore and will be able to focus on protecting Israel proper. Second, Israel will rid itself of a huge moral liability when it stops controlling the lives of the Palestinians. Third, Israel will rob Yasser Arafat of his ability to blame Israel for all Palestinian woes; this will encourage the Palestinians to find better leaders.
NEWS
October 23, 1985 | United Press International
The government of Jordan has rejected a call by Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres for direct peace talks and said it will not make a separate deal with the Jewish state, the Jordan Times reported Tuesday. Peres, speaking in New York on Monday during the 40th anniversary week of the United Nations, urged Jordan to begin talks with Israel by the end of the year to end the 37-year-old state of war between the two countries.
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