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NEWS
June 8, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE and HYUNGWON KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Devastated by disastrous flooding that swept her home away two years ago, Yang Soo Bok now struggles with a more pernicious hardship: a perilous nationwide food shortage that has reduced government rations to less than a fourth of a bowl of cornmeal a day. Yet blooming in the private garden of her newly built home is a cornucopia of 12 crops, including lettuce, pumpkin, corn and wheat. She has two fruit trees and also is raising a pig and three chickens.
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NEWS
June 8, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE and HYUNGWON KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Devastated by disastrous flooding that swept her home away two years ago, Yang Soo Bok now struggles with a more pernicious hardship: a perilous nationwide food shortage that has reduced government rations to less than a fourth of a bowl of cornmeal a day. Yet blooming in the private garden of her newly built home is a cornucopia of 12 crops, including lettuce, pumpkin, corn and wheat. She has two fruit trees and also is raising a pig and three chickens.
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NEWS
May 13, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a weeklong inspection tour of North Korea, a team of U.N. food relief experts said Monday that it found the country in a state of "near famine" but saw no evidence of starvation deaths, cannibalism or military food seizures reported by refugees and other travelers in Asia's most secretive state. Tun Myat, leader of the U.N.
NEWS
May 13, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a weeklong inspection tour of North Korea, a team of U.N. food relief experts said Monday that it found the country in a state of "near famine" but saw no evidence of starvation deaths, cannibalism or military food seizures reported by refugees and other travelers in Asia's most secretive state. Tun Myat, leader of the U.N.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council unanimously urged North Korea to allow full nuclear inspections, adopting a statement that lacks the strong sanctions threat sought by Washington. Under a compromise worked out with China, the main opponent to such a threat, the council adopted a statement that instead only hints at further action if North Korea continues to refuse to cooperate. North Korea quickly repudiated the U.N. statement and called for talks on the matter with the United States.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The North and South Korean prime ministers met today to pave the road to Korean unity, but each side apparently rejected the other's main proposals and agreed to meet again Thursday. South Korean Prime Minister Kang Young Hoon joined his northern counterpart, Yon Hyong Muk, for the two-hour session. Kang proposed that the Koreas allow cross-border travel on major holidays, restore communications and travel links, reunite families and reduce armed forces to equal levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1991
Until the late 19th Century the Western world knew Korea as the Hermit Kingdom, a shadowy land whose rulers shunned nearly all contacts with the world outside. Modern South Korea, a major trading nation, has long since eagerly sought expanded international relations. By contrast North Korea, ruled for more than 40 years by the Stalinist Kim Il Sung, clings to isolationism, sealing its people off from outside influences as one means of maintaining a rigorous ideological control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991
North Korea continues to stall on the crucial issue of opening its nuclear facilities to international inspection, adding to well-founded anxieties that it is rushing to develop nuclear weapons. Hints have already come from South Korea and the United States that this prospect, with its implicit threat to stability in Northeast Asia, won't be passively accepted. The Pentagon has taken the unusual step of letting it be known that contingency plans for a military strike are being drawn up.
WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL - Despite earlier reports of technical difficulties, North Korea launched a long-range rocket Wednesday, and initial reports indicated that in this fourth attempt since 1998, the regime in Pyongyang successfully deployed a satellite into orbit. If so, it would be a huge publicity coup for the new young leader, Kim Jong Un, and an embarrassment for rival South Korea, which has yet to establish a presence in space. The launch also caused some chagrin among intelligence analysts who were apparently misled by an announcement over the weekend that the missile launch would be delayed until later this month because of a technical glitch.
WORLD
April 6, 2009 | Paul Richter and Geraldine Baum
The United States and its allies labored Sunday to devise a concerted response to North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket, but quickly ran into divisions over how to confront the defiant regime. The United Nations Security Council met in a hastily called session to consider official condemnation of the launch, but ended the meeting with no immediate action beyond a promise to continue to seek a common response in the coming days. The U.S.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council unanimously urged North Korea to allow full nuclear inspections, adopting a statement that lacks the strong sanctions threat sought by Washington. Under a compromise worked out with China, the main opponent to such a threat, the council adopted a statement that instead only hints at further action if North Korea continues to refuse to cooperate. North Korea quickly repudiated the U.N. statement and called for talks on the matter with the United States.
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