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BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin America may need to invest $10 billion a year to make sure that economic development is "environmentally sustainable," according to a United Nations study. The document says countries of the region are increasingly aware that environmental damage, caused by both underdevelopment and development, can jeopardize future progress.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin America may need to invest $10 billion a year to make sure that economic development is "environmentally sustainable," according to a United Nations study. The document says countries of the region are increasingly aware that environmental damage, caused by both underdevelopment and development, can jeopardize future progress.
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NEWS
September 26, 1989
Latin American leaders urged industrialized nations to share in the burdens of the fight against poverty, drugs and environmental threats, saying the problems have often been spawned by the richer nations. The presidents of Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela, in speeches before the U.N. General Assembly, put strong emphasis on the need for urgent action to lead debt-ridden Latin American economies back to growth.
NEWS
September 26, 1989
Latin American leaders urged industrialized nations to share in the burdens of the fight against poverty, drugs and environmental threats, saying the problems have often been spawned by the richer nations. The presidents of Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela, in speeches before the U.N. General Assembly, put strong emphasis on the need for urgent action to lead debt-ridden Latin American economies back to growth.
OPINION
January 30, 2000 | Sergio Munoz
In early November 1999, nearly 9 million Mexicans made history. For the first time, they, and not a sitting president, chose the presidential candidate of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) by voting in an open primary. More than 5 million voted for Francisco Labastida, giving him a legitimacy hitherto unknown in Mexican presidential campaigns. Labastida's persona in Mexican politics depends on the eye of the beholder.
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