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NEWS
December 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A plane chartered by the United Nations left Switzerland with 20 metric tons of food and medicine for Liberia, where aid workers said hungry orphans were wandering through the ruins left by civil war. A team for the U.N. Disaster Relief Organization said that the city of Monrovia, with a population of 350,000, had neither food nor health care.
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NEWS
May 5, 2001 | Associated Press
The U.N. Security Council imposed sanctions against Liberia on Friday for failing to sever its ties with rebels in Sierra Leone. The current Security Council president, acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham, said the sanctions would take effect Monday and would ban the import of diamonds from Liberia and travel by senior Liberian officials. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said this week that the U.N.
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NEWS
September 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.N. refugee worker resurfaced in Liberia after being abducted in a raid that killed a colleague. Authorities offered no explanation for how Sapeu Laurence Djeya, 37, of Ivory Coast escaped her captors. Liberian Information Minister Joe W. Mulbah blamed "Guinean dissidents" for the Sept. 17 kidnapping. Mensah Kpognon, the Togolese head of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Macenta, Guinea, was killed in the attack.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.N. refugee worker resurfaced in Liberia after being abducted in a raid that killed a colleague. Authorities offered no explanation for how Sapeu Laurence Djeya, 37, of Ivory Coast escaped her captors. Liberian Information Minister Joe W. Mulbah blamed "Guinean dissidents" for the Sept. 17 kidnapping. Mensah Kpognon, the Togolese head of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Macenta, Guinea, was killed in the attack.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Liberia's warring factions reached agreement on a peace package including a cease-fire, an interim government and free elections. Many previous peace pacts, however, have failed. The accord came after a week of negotiations sponsored by the United Nations and Organization of African Unity and boosted hopes of ending the 3 1/2-year-old war that has killed an estimated 150,000 people and forced 750,000 to flee.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighters are too weak to win, too strong to be defeated, too maniacal to fathom. So Liberia awakes and greets another day of absurdity: The hope of peace seems as elusive as the war is exhausting in this wrecked nation, America's beachhead in Africa. At "Zero Guard Post"--named because to kill is to "zero someone"--on the path from Monrovia to Tubmanburg, boys wait.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | Associated Press
The U.N. Security Council imposed sanctions against Liberia on Friday for failing to sever its ties with rebels in Sierra Leone. The current Security Council president, acting U.S. Ambassador James Cunningham, said the sanctions would take effect Monday and would ban the import of diamonds from Liberia and travel by senior Liberian officials. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said this week that the U.N.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration reversed policy Tuesday and asked the United Nations to intervene to stop Liberia's slide into chaos, and officials warned of the prospect of widespread slaughter in the capital and possible starvation among thousands of refugees. Two days after government troops reportedly massacred several hundred people seeking shelter in a church, U.S. officials said that about 33,000 refugees have taken asylum at U.S. installations across Liberia, including two major U.S.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
The U.N. Security Council on Thursday authorized the use of force to cut off shipments of military supplies to rebel fighters in the war-ravaged West African nation of Liberia. In a unanimous vote, the 15-member council approved an embargo under the same U.N. provisions used to punish Yugoslavia and Iraq. The purpose of the measure is to bolster efforts by a seven-nation West African force to defeat guerrilla leader Charles Taylor.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighters are too weak to win, too strong to be defeated, too maniacal to fathom. So Liberia awakes and greets another day of absurdity: The hope of peace seems as elusive as the war is exhausting in this wrecked nation, America's beachhead in Africa. At "Zero Guard Post"--named because to kill is to "zero someone"--on the path from Monrovia to Tubmanburg, boys wait.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Liberia's warring factions reached agreement on a peace package including a cease-fire, an interim government and free elections. Many previous peace pacts, however, have failed. The accord came after a week of negotiations sponsored by the United Nations and Organization of African Unity and boosted hopes of ending the 3 1/2-year-old war that has killed an estimated 150,000 people and forced 750,000 to flee.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
The U.N. Security Council on Thursday authorized the use of force to cut off shipments of military supplies to rebel fighters in the war-ravaged West African nation of Liberia. In a unanimous vote, the 15-member council approved an embargo under the same U.N. provisions used to punish Yugoslavia and Iraq. The purpose of the measure is to bolster efforts by a seven-nation West African force to defeat guerrilla leader Charles Taylor.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A plane chartered by the United Nations left Switzerland with 20 metric tons of food and medicine for Liberia, where aid workers said hungry orphans were wandering through the ruins left by civil war. A team for the U.N. Disaster Relief Organization said that the city of Monrovia, with a population of 350,000, had neither food nor health care.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration reversed policy Tuesday and asked the United Nations to intervene to stop Liberia's slide into chaos, and officials warned of the prospect of widespread slaughter in the capital and possible starvation among thousands of refugees. Two days after government troops reportedly massacred several hundred people seeking shelter in a church, U.S. officials said that about 33,000 refugees have taken asylum at U.S. installations across Liberia, including two major U.S.
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