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United Nations Libya

NEWS
September 1, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of several desperate bids to ease the tightening grip of U.N. sanctions, Moammar Kadafi's troubled regime in Libya has held out the prospect of turning over an indicted CIA renegade to appease the U.S. government, according to U.S. sources and a former CIA official.
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NEWS
November 30, 1993
Tougher U.N. sanctions against Libya aimed at forcing the renegade North African nation to hand over two suspects in the 1988 terrorist bombing of an American jetliner are scheduled to go into effect Wednesday. The sanctions include a new freeze on Libya's financial assets abroad, a ban on spare parts for the country's oil facilities and new restrictions on domestic air travel.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council, increasing the pressure on Libya to surrender two suspects in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103, tightened economic sanctions a notch Thursday but stopped short of imposing an oil embargo that would cause real pain not only to the Libyan government but to much of Europe. The new measures, added to sanctions in force for the last 19 months, freeze Libya's financial assets held abroad and ban sale to the North African country of equipment needed for the oil industry.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two days before the U.N. Security Council was to consider tougher economic sanctions, Libya agreed Wednesday to surrender two intelligence operatives to face trial in Scotland for the 1988 bombing of Pan American Flight 103, a U.N. spokesman said. Foreign Minister Omar Mustafa Muntasser informed U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali of the Libyan government's decision during a late-afternoon meeting in the secretary general's office. The U.N.
NEWS
September 28, 1993
Libya faces a threatened freeze of its overseas assets and other new economic sanctions if it fails to turn over by Friday two nationals charged in the December, 1988, bombing of a Pan Am flight over Scotland, which killed 270 people. The U.N. Security Council has demanded that the pair be turned over to the United States or Britain for prosecution, but Libya claims that they would not receive a fair trial in either country. It has suggested trying them in a neutral country, such as Switzerland.
NEWS
August 10, 1993
The U.N. Security Council next week is to review sanctions imposed against Libya in April, 1992, after Tripoli refused to hand over two suspects in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 to either the United States or Britain. Libya has offered to turn the pair over to a neutral third country for trial and to pay compensation if they are found guilty of the crime, which killed 270 people. But the Security Council has said that is not good enough.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Security Council decided to continue the sanctions it imposed on Libya a year ago over the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 that killed 270 people, and the United States raised the possibility of eventually adding an oil embargo. The existing mandatory sanctions involve an arms and aviation embargo and the downgrading of diplomatic ties. They were imposed after Libya failed to surrender for trial two men indicted in Britain and the United States for involvement in the bombing.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | From Associated Press
France, Britain and the United States issued a stern warning Friday to Libya for failing to renounce terrorism or help bring Libyan suspects of two airline bombings to justice. The nations vowed to make U.N. sanctions against Tripoli "even more effective" but gave no indication how they intended to tighten the embargo. Libya says the U.N. sanctions that ban air travel and arms sales and curtail diplomatic relations have cost it $2.4 billion since they were imposed March 31.
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libya's Arab neighbors have indicated that they would be prepared to step up the pressure on Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi to hand over suspects accused in a fatal airline bombing, but a U.N. mission to Libya expressed hope that the crisis could be resolved short of a full trade embargo or other new sanctions. "We are optimistic that the situation can be resolved soon," Tunisian Foreign Minister Habib Ben Yahia said in an interview after meeting with U.N. envoy Vladimir Petrovsky.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libya, seeking to avert the threat of escalated sanctions in the case of two suspects wanted in the bombing of an American airliner, has indicated it might consider releasing the two men for trial in Scotland with the presence of observers from neutral countries, according to Arab diplomatic sources.
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