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United Nations Liechtenstein

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September 20, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Alpine principality of Liechtenstein Tuesday became the 160th and smallest member of the United Nations. The 61.7 square mile nation, squeezed between Switzerland and Austria, was so impoverished after World War I that the reigning prince had to dip into his personal fortune to buy food for a population reduced to less than half the 28,000 of today. The Liechtenstein family could afford it--they are second only to the British royal family in the possession of priceless art works.
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NEWS
September 20, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Alpine principality of Liechtenstein Tuesday became the 160th and smallest member of the United Nations. The 61.7 square mile nation, squeezed between Switzerland and Austria, was so impoverished after World War I that the reigning prince had to dip into his personal fortune to buy food for a population reduced to less than half the 28,000 of today. The Liechtenstein family could afford it--they are second only to the British royal family in the possession of priceless art works.
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NEWS
December 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Parliament of the principality of Liechtenstein voted unanimously to have its wealthy but tiny nation bid for membership in the United Nations. All 25 legislators backed a government proposal to send a formal application to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar in the spring. Hans Brunhart, the chief of government, said the vote in Vaduz was a "historic step" in Liechtenstein's foreign policy. If the U.N.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Parliament of the principality of Liechtenstein voted unanimously to have its wealthy but tiny nation bid for membership in the United Nations. All 25 legislators backed a government proposal to send a formal application to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar in the spring. Hans Brunhart, the chief of government, said the vote in Vaduz was a "historic step" in Liechtenstein's foreign policy. If the U.N.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | Associated Press
This tiny principality said Friday it plans to seek full membership in the United Nations next year. Liechtenstein, which on many maps is not much bigger than the famous postage stamps it exports, comprises 63 square miles. If accepted, it would replace the 100-square-mile Caribbean nation of St. Kitts-Nevis as the smallest in the United Nations. Nestled in a mountain valley between Switzerland and Austria, Liechtenstein is known as a tax haven and skier's paradise.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | Associated Press
This tiny principality said Friday it plans to seek full membership in the United Nations next year. Liechtenstein, which on many maps is not much bigger than the famous postage stamps it exports, comprises 63 square miles. If accepted, it would replace the 100-square-mile Caribbean nation of St. Kitts-Nevis as the smallest in the United Nations. Nestled in a mountain valley between Switzerland and Austria, Liechtenstein is known as a tax haven and skier's paradise.
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