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February 21, 1990 | Reuters
Problems with Nicaragua's election campaign have been addressed well enough for people to have a free choice when they vote Sunday, United Nations envoy Elliot Richardson said Tuesday. Richardson, a former U.S. attorney general charged by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar with observing the elections, arrived in Nicaragua on Tuesday and will stay until after the elections.
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NEWS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A group of 260 Nicaraguan rebels turned over their weapons to U.N. observers sent to Honduras to help demobilize the U.S.-backed Contras, a U.N. spokeswoman said. She said the U.N. team of about 30 unarmed observers carried explosives, soldering torches and sledgehammers to destroy the surrendered weapons.
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NEWS
April 1, 1988 | United Press International
A special U.N. panel confirmed Washington's charge that Nicaraguan forces crossed into Honduras last month in pursuit of the U.S.-backed Contras, officials said Thursday. In a report to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar in New York, investigators said "it was acknowledged" that the Nicaraguan forces penetrated Honduran territory by more than 2 miles.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Contra leader who agreed to end the Nicaraguan war said Saturday that most of his men will keep their guns after Sandinista President Daniel Ortega leaves office next month and asserted that the rebels will press his successor to disband the Sandinista-led army.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration, maintaining that a December deadline for disarming Nicaragua's Contras is not binding, said Tuesday that it will resist any efforts to demobilize the rebel forces until the leftist government in Managua institutes democratic reforms. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said the United States is "generally supportive" of a Central American agreement that calls for dismantling the rebel army within four months but does not believe that the plan's Dec.
NEWS
July 28, 1989
The U.N. Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution designed to boost the peace process in Central America and called for an end to the conflict between the U.S.-backed Contras and the Nicaraguan government. Washington supported the resolution and voiced strong support for Nicaragua's plans to hold elections next year.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two days of talks at the United Nations in New York between Nicaragua's Sandinista government and Contra rebels adjourned for the weekend without any signs of progress on the major issues of reinstating a cease-fire and demobilizing the rebels. U.N. spokesman Juan Carlos Brandt said the talks would resume Monday at the headquarters of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington. Nicaragua's Sandinista government sought a comprehensive accord leading to Contra demobilization.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Daniel Ortega said Wednesday that the Sandinista army will suspend acquisitions of new weapons until next April 25 if the U.S.-backed Contras accept a timetable for closing their bases in Honduras. Ortega outlined his proposal after dispatching six Sandinista negotiators to New York for talks with Contra leaders at U.N. headquarters starting today. He instructed his team to insist on a settlement in a single round of meetings.
NEWS
October 14, 1989
A joint commission of the United Nations and the Organization of American States has told thousands of Nicaraguan Contras that they have outlived their purpose as a fighting force and should go home peaceably. The commission delivered the diplomatic message, which was extraordinary for its bluntness, to more than 2,500 rebel troops and commanders assembled Thursday at Contra camps in Yamales, Honduras, near the Nicaraguan border.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grim-faced, five-member delegation of the reconstituted Contra leadership sat down here Thursday for new peace talks with Nicaragua's government, with the Sandinistas pushing hard for an agreement on a partial demobilization of the resistance movement. The two days of talks at U.N. headquarters here are intended to find a way to stop the new fighting between the Sandinistas and the U.S.-backed rebels.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS and DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Using Vice President Dan Quayle as its messenger, the Bush Administration has bluntly informed Nicaragua's Contras that they have no choice but to disband their forces, leaving some of the rebel commanders openly bitter. Quayle, whom the Contras viewed as their staunchest ally in the Administration, told three rebel chiefs as recently as Friday that their troops must turn in their weapons to a U.N. peacekeeping force at the same time that the new, U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, seeking to demobilize simultaneously the Sandinista and Contra forces in Nicaragua, is considering a plan to insert U.N. peacekeeping troops between the hostile military units, a senior Administration official said Friday. The proposal was portrayed as a possible solution to the lack of progress in the effort to get the Sandinistas, upset in the Feb.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Jimmy Carter was president, Sandinista guerrillas overthrew a U.S.-backed dictator and ended more than a century of strong American influence in Nicaragua. Today, after nearly a decade of hostilities with Washington, the Sandinistas have invited Carter here as one of the chief judges of an election that they hope will heal the wounds of another guerrilla war and end the hostilities.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | Reuters
Problems with Nicaragua's election campaign have been addressed well enough for people to have a free choice when they vote Sunday, United Nations envoy Elliot Richardson said Tuesday. Richardson, a former U.S. attorney general charged by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar with observing the elections, arrived in Nicaragua on Tuesday and will stay until after the elections.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega accused the opposition of plotting to create a "situation like Panama" by withdrawing from the Feb. 25 national elections. He said he told Elliot Richardson, a former U.S. attorney general who is monitoring the campaign and election for the United Nations, that he fears such a ploy would set the stage for the United States to declare the election fraudulent and invade the country.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two days of talks at the United Nations in New York between Nicaragua's Sandinista government and Contra rebels adjourned for the weekend without any signs of progress on the major issues of reinstating a cease-fire and demobilizing the rebels. U.N. spokesman Juan Carlos Brandt said the talks would resume Monday at the headquarters of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington. Nicaragua's Sandinista government sought a comprehensive accord leading to Contra demobilization.
NEWS
December 6, 1988
Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, saying the United States has placed unacceptable restrictions on his travel and on the size of his party, canceled plans to visit the United Nations. Ortega, in Mexico City for the inauguration of President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, told a news conference that he had wanted to visit the United Nations to discuss the latest Central American peace initiative and to plead for aid for his hurricane-battered country. U.S.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A group of 260 Nicaraguan rebels turned over their weapons to U.N. observers sent to Honduras to help demobilize the U.S.-backed Contras, a U.N. spokeswoman said. She said the U.N. team of about 30 unarmed observers carried explosives, soldering torches and sledgehammers to destroy the surrendered weapons.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grim-faced, five-member delegation of the reconstituted Contra leadership sat down here Thursday for new peace talks with Nicaragua's government, with the Sandinistas pushing hard for an agreement on a partial demobilization of the resistance movement. The two days of talks at U.N. headquarters here are intended to find a way to stop the new fighting between the Sandinistas and the U.S.-backed rebels.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Daniel Ortega said Wednesday that the Sandinista army will suspend acquisitions of new weapons until next April 25 if the U.S.-backed Contras accept a timetable for closing their bases in Honduras. Ortega outlined his proposal after dispatching six Sandinista negotiators to New York for talks with Contra leaders at U.N. headquarters starting today. He instructed his team to insist on a settlement in a single round of meetings.
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