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United Nations Peacekeeping Forces

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NEWS
April 12, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Blue Helmets, as everyone calls the United Nations' peacekeeping forces, are not even mentioned in the U.N. Charter. The late Dag Hammerskjold, secretary general in the 1960s, joked that they were authorized by "Chapter 6 1/2"--somewhere between Chapter 6, which deals with the peaceful settlement of disputes, and Chapter 7, which deals with aggression. Yet, since the United Nations was founded in 1945, the Blue Helmets have become one of the organization's most glamorous, effective units.
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WORLD
November 21, 2008 | A Times Staff Writer
The U.N. Security Council on Thursday authorized increasing the number of peacekeepers in the Democratic Republic of Congo by as many as 2,785 military personnel and 300 police. Now it's up to the United Nations peacekeeping operations to recruit volunteers from among the armed forces of member states. The majority of the 17,000 soldiers already in the region are Indian or Pakistani.
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NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council approved sending an advance force of peacekeepers to Cambodia. The initial contingent is scheduled to go to the Southeast Asian country after an accord ending 13 years of civil war between a Hanoi-backed government and three guerrilla factions is signed next week.
WORLD
April 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
At least three people were killed and 25 injured in food riots and clashes with U.N. peacekeepers Friday, a mission spokeswoman and Haitian radio said. A young man was shot in the head and killed during protests in southern Haiti. It was not immediately clear who shot him, though protesters blamed United Nations troops. U.N. soldiers fired because they were fired upon, said U.N. spokeswoman Sophie Boutaud de la Combe. She said the mission had opened an investigation.
WORLD
November 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Philippines will send up to 150 soldiers to Haiti next week to help United Nations peacekeeping forces stem political unrest and a wave of killings, an army spokesman said. Lt. Col. Buenaventura Pascual, a spokesman for the military, said the Philippine troops would join nearly 4,000 peacekeepers in Haiti. The country has been racked by violence since President Jean-Bertrand Aristide was ousted in February. Nearly 200 people in Haiti have been killed in the last two months.
WORLD
December 18, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
One evening four months ago, a soft-spoken 18-year-old named Aziza was selling bananas in the market here when some U.N. peacekeepers summoned her to their car. Aziza went over thinking they wanted to buy fruit, but was persuaded to engage in a different kind of transaction. "They offered me love," she said, in the colloquial French spoken in this former Belgian colony. And they offered her money -- just $5, but more than she would make in a month at the market.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the wily, elfish, traditional ruler of Cambodia, has invited U.N. officials, diplomats and visiting Americans to celebrations in a tiny northern village on the Thai border so he can lecture them. Gesturing dramatically, churning his hands continually, laughing in a high-pitched giggle, Sihanouk embarks on a 20-minute monologue, edged in irony. As he speaks, servant girls gracefully crawl on their knees past the 70-year-old leader to serve drinks to the guests.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Past bombed-out buildings and burned-out cars, near grim skull-and-crossbones signs for a roadside minefield, a dusty cluster of military tents here holds the hopes for lasting peace in Africa's longest civil war. But Angola has dashed such hopes before. And despite a shaky 14 1/2-month cease-fire after two decades of death and devastation, it may be doing it again.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Front pages of newspapers across France on Tuesday carried stark images of this country's brave young troops in manacles--solemn soldiers handcuffed to poles, some handcuffed to each other and others with arms raised in surrender to Bosnian Serbs. These photographs alone might, in another country, stir deep anger, galvanize public opinion and touch off endless political soul-searching. And, to be sure, families of the 4,000 or so French troops on duty with the U.N.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | PETER MAASS, THE WASHINGTON POST
A soldier in the Bosnian Serb army assassinated Bosnian Deputy Prime Minister Hakija Turajlic on Friday at an illegal roadblock near the Sarajevo airport, pushing aside a French U.N. commander to gun down the Muslim politician as he sat in a U.N. armored personnel carrier. The killing, which occurred 400 yards from the French-run U.N. command post, dealt a major blow to the standing of U.N. peacekeeping forces in Bosnia and jeopardized U.N.-sponsored peace talks due to resume Sunday in Geneva.
WORLD
February 20, 2008 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, expressing frustration that the United Nations has had a difficult time raising and deploying a sufficient peacekeeping force in Darfur, said Tuesday that the 1994 Rwandan genocide should have taught the world not to ignore signs of budding brutality. Bush said Rwanda would receive $12 million of the $100-million contribution the U.S. is making this year to U.N. peacekeeping efforts in Darfur.
WORLD
January 10, 2008 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The U.N. peacekeeping chief told the Security Council on Wednesday that a Sudanese attack this week on U.N.-led troops reinforces concerns that the force may be unable to protect itself or civilians in Darfur. The violence, along with foot-dragging by the Sudanese government and the lack of necessary helicopters and equipment, may doom the peacekeeping effort, Jean-Marie Guehenno told the council.
WORLD
June 25, 2007 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
A bomb ripped through a United Nations convoy in southern Lebanon on Sunday, killing six peacekeepers under Spanish command. The attack, which took place on a day when the Lebanese military fought a bloody battle against Sunni Muslim radicals in the north, heightened fears that a second front may have opened in the fight here against militants linked to Al Qaeda.
WORLD
April 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Sudan has signed an agreement with the United Nations and the African Union that defines their respective roles in Darfur, Saudi Arabia's official news agency reported. No details about the agreement were provided. The United Nations and Sudan agreed in November on a three-stage plan to deploy U.N. peacekeepers to help the understaffed and under-equipped African Union force in the Sudanese region of Darfur.
WORLD
January 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations' first women-only peacekeeping contingent -- made up of about 100 Indian police officers -- arrived in Liberia, officials said. Ben Malor, spokesman for the U.N.'s 15,000-strong peacekeeping force in the West African country, said the female force would be stationed in the capital, Monrovia. Women have served in many U.N. peacekeeping forces, but this is the first all-female group.
WORLD
December 4, 2006 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Nearly two months after the rest of its army left southern Lebanon, Israel agreed Sunday to pull its few dozen remaining soldiers from the Lebanese part of a village divided by the border, yielding control to U.N. peacekeepers. The move came as Israel's Cabinet discussed the 3-day-old siege of Lebanese Prime Minister Fouad Siniora's government by masses of pro-Hezbollah demonstrators in Beirut.
NEWS
May 9, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an organized drive to ensure Serbia's hold on territory seized from Croatia, Serbian gunmen have been rounding up Croats, Slovaks and Hungarians at night, forcing them to sign over all property and dumping them in a dangerous no man's land to make their way across minefields in the dark. U.N. officials report at least 400 cases of forced expulsions from Serbian-held eastern Croatia last month, including some in which U.N. troops were enlisted as accomplices.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step he called "both symbolic and tangible," Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced Thursday that the United States will send a reinforced infantry company of 300 troops to Macedonia to join a U.N. observer force intended to prevent the Balkan war from spilling over into another former Yugoslav republic. Although Macedonia is relatively peaceful and is well away from the Bosnia-Herzegovina war zone, the infantrymen will be the first U.S.
WORLD
December 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Since the beginning of 2004, nearly 180 soldiers, civilians and police in U.N. peacekeeping missions have been removed after sexual abuse inquiries, U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said Thursday. Despite the United Nations' "zero tolerance," he said, "acts of sexual exploitation and abuse by U.N. peacekeeping personnel continue to occur." Since January 2004, the U.N. has investigated 319 peacekeeping personnel in all U.N. missions, Dujarric said.
WORLD
November 17, 2006 | From the Associated Press
African, Arab, European and U.N. leaders agreed in principle Thursday to a joint African Union-United Nations peacekeeping force for Sudan's Darfur region. The force could be as large as 27,000, including the existing 7,000-member African Union force now there, but the leaders did not set a timetable for deployment, partly because Sudan has concerns, including the question of who would be in charge. U.N.
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