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NEWS
October 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Six U.N. military observers and their translator were taken hostage as they were delivering aid in Georgia's breakaway territory of Abkhazia. Negotiators were in contact with the abductors, and Interior Minister Kakha Targamadze said on television that "there are special units there which are able to perform the operation of liberating the hostages, but we are doing everything possible to avoid bloodshed." Officials said the kidnappers were seeking $200,000 in ransom.
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NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia rejected a U.N. Security Council plan to dispatch a mission to Indonesia and East Timor to investigate the resurgence of militia activity against U.N. workers and civilians, the Defense Ministry said. A mob of militiamen and supporters attacked an office of the U.N. refugee agency in the West Timor border town of Atambua last week, killing three foreign staffers and prompting about 400 aid workers to flee the Indonesian province.
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NEWS
October 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
After negotiations with Georgian officials, kidnappers on Friday released the last three of seven U.N. workers taken hostage in Georgia's breakaway Abkhazia region, a government spokeswoman said. Interior Minister Kakha Targamadze said the three were freed after officials guaranteed the abductors that special forces would not be sent to capture them. Defense Minister David Tevzadze and presidential envoy Iveri Chelidze were involved in the negotiations. The six U.N.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
Carlos Caceres, a U.N. refugee worker in the West Timor town of Atambua, sent this e-mail to a colleague with the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees early Wednesday. Pro-Indonesian militia members and supporters, angered by the death of a militia leader, killed Caceres, who was from Puerto Rico, and at least two other colleagues a short time later. "I was in the office when the news came out that a wave of violence would soon pound Atambua.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said that it was suspending operations in West Timor after three of its workers were severely injured in an attack by pro-Indonesian militias. The anti-independence militia gangs have also set up roadblocks in the Indonesian province to stop refugees from returning home to East Timor, said U.N. refugee agency spokesman Jake Morland, adding that Indonesia's military was doing nothing to stop the rising tensions in the region.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia rejected a U.N. Security Council plan to dispatch a mission to Indonesia and East Timor to investigate the resurgence of militia activity against U.N. workers and civilians, the Defense Ministry said. A mob of militiamen and supporters attacked an office of the U.N. refugee agency in the West Timor border town of Atambua last week, killing three foreign staffers and prompting about 400 aid workers to flee the Indonesian province.
NEWS
November 15, 1988
A total of 168 U.N. staff members were arrested or abducted in the last year, Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said. Israel's crackdown on the Palestinian uprising in the West Bank and Gaza Strip resulted in the largest number of such incidents, involving employees of the U.N. Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees, a statement by the union representing the U.N. staff said.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
Carlos Caceres, a U.N. refugee worker in the West Timor town of Atambua, sent this e-mail to a colleague with the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees early Wednesday. Pro-Indonesian militia members and supporters, angered by the death of a militia leader, killed Caceres, who was from Puerto Rico, and at least two other colleagues a short time later. "I was in the office when the news came out that a wave of violence would soon pound Atambua.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of gunmen freed four of seven U.N. workers they had kidnapped in a renegade region of Georgia, but the abductors demanded a higher ransom for releasing the remaining three, officials said. The four U.N. observers--from Germany, Switzerland, the Czech Republic and Uruguay--were released a day and a half after being seized in the northwestern region of Abkhazia. Those still held hostage are a translator and observers from Sweden and Greece.
WORLD
July 29, 2004 | From Reuters
NATO envoys failed to agree Wednesday on plans for training Iraq's security forces because of disagreements, particularly between the United States and France, over who will command the mission and who will pay. "It's not over, there will be another meeting tomorrow morning," an official said as ambassadors of the 26 NATO nations emerged from their second meeting of the day on Iraq.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said that it was suspending operations in West Timor after three of its workers were severely injured in an attack by pro-Indonesian militias. The anti-independence militia gangs have also set up roadblocks in the Indonesian province to stop refugees from returning home to East Timor, said U.N. refugee agency spokesman Jake Morland, adding that Indonesia's military was doing nothing to stop the rising tensions in the region.
NEWS
October 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
After negotiations with Georgian officials, kidnappers on Friday released the last three of seven U.N. workers taken hostage in Georgia's breakaway Abkhazia region, a government spokeswoman said. Interior Minister Kakha Targamadze said the three were freed after officials guaranteed the abductors that special forces would not be sent to capture them. Defense Minister David Tevzadze and presidential envoy Iveri Chelidze were involved in the negotiations. The six U.N.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of gunmen freed four of seven U.N. workers they had kidnapped in a renegade region of Georgia, but the abductors demanded a higher ransom for releasing the remaining three, officials said. The four U.N. observers--from Germany, Switzerland, the Czech Republic and Uruguay--were released a day and a half after being seized in the northwestern region of Abkhazia. Those still held hostage are a translator and observers from Sweden and Greece.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Six U.N. military observers and their translator were taken hostage as they were delivering aid in Georgia's breakaway territory of Abkhazia. Negotiators were in contact with the abductors, and Interior Minister Kakha Targamadze said on television that "there are special units there which are able to perform the operation of liberating the hostages, but we are doing everything possible to avoid bloodshed." Officials said the kidnappers were seeking $200,000 in ransom.
NEWS
November 15, 1988
A total of 168 U.N. staff members were arrested or abducted in the last year, Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said. Israel's crackdown on the Palestinian uprising in the West Bank and Gaza Strip resulted in the largest number of such incidents, involving employees of the U.N. Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees, a statement by the union representing the U.N. staff said.
OPINION
September 26, 2003
The Bush administration is not at risk of damaging its credibility in Iraq; it's in danger of destroying it. The latest developments on U.S. troop deployments and still-undiscovered Iraqi weapons of mass destruction suggest that the administration either is in total disarray or it actively seeks to mislead the public. For months, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld stoutly denied that more troops were needed in Iraq, even with U.S. soldiers being killed each day.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the fourth U.N. aid worker in a month was killed this week, thousands of U.N. staffers around the world took part Thursday in silent marches to draw attention to the number of their colleagues who have died in the line of duty and to ask for better protection. In front of U.N. headquarters in New York, more than 1,000 employees wearing black armbands and carrying photos of their slain colleagues marched solemnly around a fountain. The world body's flag was lowered to half-staff while U.N.
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