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NEWS
June 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Congo's new president, Laurent Kabila, has told local officials in the country's east to do as little as possible to aid a U.N. investigation into alleged massacres of Rwandan Hutu refugees by his troops, Western and Congolese sources said. At an unusual meeting in Bukavu last weekend, Kabila warned the officials not to direct human rights investigators to any mass grave sites or potential witnesses, the sources said.
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NEWS
February 3, 2001 | EVELYN LEOPOLD, REUTERS
Congo's President Joseph Kabila told the United Nations on Friday he was willing to begin a dialogue with his military and political enemies and urged them to reciprocate "without reservations." "We want to bring together all the Congolese while at the same time respecting differences among them," Kabila said, referring to military and civilian opponents. Addressing the U.N.
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NEWS
August 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three investigators will probe allegations that troops under the command of Congo President Laurent Kabila massacred thousands of unarmed refugees earlier this year, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan announced. Annan selected Reed Brody, a veteran American lawyer and activist; Atsu-Koffi Amega, president of the Supreme Court of Togo; and Andrew R. Chigovera, deputy attorney general of Zimbabwe.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.N. Security Council envoys arrived in Africa on Thursday to assess prospects for deploying peacekeepers in the Democratic Republic of Congo, analysts expressed doubt about the success of such a force in the wake of an attack this week against U.N. troops elsewhere on the continent.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Ambassador Bill Richardson said he was leaving for Central and East Africa with slim hopes of persuading President Laurent Kabila's Congo to allow a stalled U.N. human rights mission to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees. Richardson plans to begin his five-day trip in Kinshasa, the Congolese capital, then go to Angola, Rwanda, Kenya, Eritrea and Ethiopia, where he is to talk to leaders of the Organization of African Unity. U.N.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | Reuters
The three leaders of a U.N. massacre probe in the Democratic Republic of Congo will leave the Central African country for consultations, one of the three said Wednesday. Reed Brody, one of two deputy heads of the team, said the purpose of his and his colleagues' departure is to enable the government of President Laurent Kabila to clarify its position and let the team start work. Kabila denied asking for the immediate withdrawal of the team. The U.N.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Congolese President Laurent Kabila told reporters here Tuesday that a United Nations team investigating alleged massacres in the former Zaire should leave the country. "We request [U.N. Secretary-General] Kofi Annan to ask them to leave," Kabila said at Lusaka airport as he boarded a plane for home. U.N. officials in New York said they learned of Kabila's comments from a news report and were seeking confirmation. However, Mary Robinson, the newly named U.N.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Laurent Kabila and America's U.N. ambassador announced an agreement that clears the way for a U.N. investigation into alleged massacres by Kabila's army. U.N. Ambassador Bill Richardson said he hoped the probe can begin early next month, ending an impasse that threatened to strain relations between the world body and Kabila's government.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Half a year after six nations signed a cease-fire in the Congolese conflict, the U.N. Security Council on Thursday authorized a 5,500-member observer force to monitor its implementation and lay the groundwork for possible deployment of a peacekeeping force. The former combatants already are pressing for the United Nations to send peacekeepers, but the Security Council first wants the opposing sides to honor the cease-fire. The 15-member council unanimously agreed to the U.S.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Secretary-General Kofi Annan suspended a human rights team's investigation of alleged massacres in Congo on Thursday after authorities there seized a team member and his U.N. documents. Annan didn't withdraw the team outright, but was halting its work "in view of the serious nature of the circumstances" until a final decision was made, U.N. spokesman Juan Carlos Brandt said. The 20 members of the U.N.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Half a year after six nations signed a cease-fire in the Congolese conflict, the U.N. Security Council on Thursday authorized a 5,500-member observer force to monitor its implementation and lay the groundwork for possible deployment of a peacekeeping force. The former combatants already are pressing for the United Nations to send peacekeepers, but the Security Council first wants the opposing sides to honor the cease-fire. The 15-member council unanimously agreed to the U.S.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Secretary-General Kofi Annan suspended a human rights team's investigation of alleged massacres in Congo on Thursday after authorities there seized a team member and his U.N. documents. Annan didn't withdraw the team outright, but was halting its work "in view of the serious nature of the circumstances" until a final decision was made, U.N. spokesman Juan Carlos Brandt said. The 20 members of the U.N.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Laurent Kabila and America's U.N. ambassador announced an agreement that clears the way for a U.N. investigation into alleged massacres by Kabila's army. U.N. Ambassador Bill Richardson said he hoped the probe can begin early next month, ending an impasse that threatened to strain relations between the world body and Kabila's government.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Ambassador Bill Richardson said he was leaving for Central and East Africa with slim hopes of persuading President Laurent Kabila's Congo to allow a stalled U.N. human rights mission to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees. Richardson plans to begin his five-day trip in Kinshasa, the Congolese capital, then go to Angola, Rwanda, Kenya, Eritrea and Ethiopia, where he is to talk to leaders of the Organization of African Unity. U.N.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | Reuters
The three leaders of a U.N. massacre probe in the Democratic Republic of Congo will leave the Central African country for consultations, one of the three said Wednesday. Reed Brody, one of two deputy heads of the team, said the purpose of his and his colleagues' departure is to enable the government of President Laurent Kabila to clarify its position and let the team start work. Kabila denied asking for the immediate withdrawal of the team. The U.N.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Congolese President Laurent Kabila told reporters here Tuesday that a United Nations team investigating alleged massacres in the former Zaire should leave the country. "We request [U.N. Secretary-General] Kofi Annan to ask them to leave," Kabila said at Lusaka airport as he boarded a plane for home. U.N. officials in New York said they learned of Kabila's comments from a news report and were seeking confirmation. However, Mary Robinson, the newly named U.N.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | EVELYN LEOPOLD, REUTERS
Congo's President Joseph Kabila told the United Nations on Friday he was willing to begin a dialogue with his military and political enemies and urged them to reciprocate "without reservations." "We want to bring together all the Congolese while at the same time respecting differences among them," Kabila said, referring to military and civilian opponents. Addressing the U.N.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.N. Security Council envoys arrived in Africa on Thursday to assess prospects for deploying peacekeepers in the Democratic Republic of Congo, analysts expressed doubt about the success of such a force in the wake of an attack this week against U.N. troops elsewhere on the continent.
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three investigators will probe allegations that troops under the command of Congo President Laurent Kabila massacred thousands of unarmed refugees earlier this year, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan announced. Annan selected Reed Brody, a veteran American lawyer and activist; Atsu-Koffi Amega, president of the Supreme Court of Togo; and Andrew R. Chigovera, deputy attorney general of Zimbabwe.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary-General Kofi Annan announced Monday that he will replace the United Nations' top human rights investigator in Congo in an effort to push forward a much-delayed investigation into reported massacres of refugees by soldiers allied with Congolese President Laurent Kabila. Kabila agreed June 7 to cooperate with the investigation following a meeting in Lubumbashi, Congo, with top U.S. officials, including U.N.
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