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United Nations Rwanda

NEWS
May 5, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A global lack of willpower was to blame for the failure to prevent Rwanda's 1994 genocide, Kofi Annan, the United Nations secretary-general, acknowledged Monday. But he said he had no personal regrets for decisions he made as then-head of U.N. peacekeeping.
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NEWS
February 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
U.N. peacekeepers could have saved hundreds of thousands of lives during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda if world leaders had responded to pleas for 50,000 troops and more equipment, the U.N. force's commander at the time, Canadian Gen. Romeo Dallaire, told the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, convened in the northeastern Tanzanian town of Arusha. It was not the United Nations but world leaders who were to blame, Dallaire said.
NEWS
December 13, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the government is downplaying a deadly surge in rebel violence in northwestern Rwanda, concerns are rising over this country's stability and the failure of the Rwandan army to quell a slow-burning conflict that some observers fear could explode into ethnic war. Rwandan officials say they take the rebel Hutus' killing sprees seriously, but they insist that the individuals involved are not organized and are devoid of any political objective.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An estimated 500,000 lives might have been saved in Rwanda if the U.N. had rushed 5,000 peacekeeping troops to that nation in 1994, a prominent international group has concluded in a sweeping report calling on nations to intensify their efforts to defuse murderous conflicts before they storm out of control.
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A Belgian legislative commission investigating the 1994 genocide in Rwanda is weighing strong evidence that U.N. peacekeepers in the Central African country could have prevented or at least hindered the extermination campaign but were thwarted by superiors at the world body's headquarters in New York. A key document in the panel's investigation, according to a Belgian senator who is a member, is an urgent fax sent by the head of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Rwanda at the time, Canadian Maj.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mismanagement in the administration of an international court set up by the U.N. to prosecute war criminals in Rwanda has hampered the investigation of the 1994 genocide there, a report released Wednesday said. The U.N. inspector general uncovered faulty accounting practices, hiring of unqualified applicants, widespread disregard of U.N. regulations and feuding among top officials at the tribunal's administrative headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania. It also cited neglect of the problems by U.N.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior United Nations and other international aid officials meeting here Thursday suddenly froze in stunned silence when a U.N. security officer angrily accosted others at the table. "How many bodies do you want?" he said emotionally. "We're soft targets! And we make headlines." The outburst highlighted the anguished debate that has erupted here over the role and responsibilities of international aid workers. At issue is whether Rwanda suddenly has become too dangerous for the U.N.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a deadly surge of attacks on humanitarian aid groups, the United Nations withdrew hundreds of expatriate and Rwandan relief workers from western Rwanda in armed convoys Wednesday and sharply curtailed operations in the rest of this increasingly tense country. The emergency pullout from four provinces followed the brutal ambush Tuesday of five U.N.
NEWS
February 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Gunmen ambushed a U.N. human rights team in a Hutu stronghold in southwestern Rwanda, killing five people in the third attack on international aid workers in recent weeks. Two human rights monitors, a Briton and a Cambodian, and two Rwandan local employees were killed immediately. A fifth man, also a Rwandan, was shot in the stomach and died after he underwent surgery. In Geneva, U.N.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Algerian diplomat appointed as the U.N.'s special envoy to Zaire, Burundi and Rwanda said Tuesday that it may take a huge injection of Western aid--a "mini-Marshall Plan"--to halt the spiral of violence in the war-ravaged Central African nations. Mohamed Sahnoun will go to Africa next week to try to halt the bloodshed, which includes a civil war in Zaire and a cycle of attacks and reprisals by ethnic Hutus and Tutsis in Rwanda and Burundi.
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