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United Nations Security Council

WORLD
December 24, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Security Council voted unanimously Saturday to impose sanctions on Iran intended to curtail its nuclear program, ending two months of haggling that highlighted the divisions among council members rather than their unity. The resolution, delayed by disagreements over how restrictive the penalties should be, bans the transfer of technology and materials that could help Iran build nuclear weapons and the missiles to deliver them.
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WORLD
November 8, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Panama won a two-year term on the Security Council on Tuesday, making the powerful body's composition for 2007 much less contrarian than the U.S. had feared should Venezuela have won the Latin American seat. But the new council still will include voices that could challenge the United States, such as South Africa, a leader of developing nations. Panama emerged last week as the compromise candidate to fill the regional seat, ending a protracted standoff between U.S.
WORLD
November 2, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Ending a two-week-long standoff, Venezuela and Guatemala bowed out of the race for a U.N. Security Council seat Wednesday and chose Panama as a compromise candidate. The contest for a seat for Latin America and the Caribbean had become a protracted battle between Guatemala, backed by the United States, and Venezuela, which portrayed itself as a challenger to U.S. dominance at the United Nations.
WORLD
October 26, 2006 | From Reuters
Venezuela and Guatemala have agreed in principle to end their deadlocked contest for a seat on the U.N. Security Council, but they differ on an alternative candidate, diplomats said. After six ballots Wednesday, 41 in total since last week, Guatemala received 100 to 109 votes in each round compared with Venezuela's 72 to 84 votes. But a nation must get a two-thirds majority in the 192-member General Assembly to win the Security Council seat.
WORLD
October 20, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
After three days and 35 rounds of voting, Guatemala and Venezuela agreed Thursday to a timeout until next week in their deadlocked contest for a U.N. Security Council seat. Latin American and Caribbean diplomats hope to come up with a compromise candidate by the time voting resumes Wednesday, after the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr on Monday and Tuesday.
WORLD
October 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Venezuela refused to abandon its bid for a Security Council seat despite the fact that it trailed Guatemala in many rounds of voting, creating a deadlock that led to calls for a compromise candidate. In the latest round -- the 22nd over two days -- Guatemala garnered 102 votes to Venezuela's 77. That result was short of the two-thirds majority of the 192-member General Assembly needed to win, and diplomats said it appeared that neither nation would be able to bridge the gap.
WORLD
October 17, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Guatemala and Venezuela began battling for a seat on the Security Council on Monday in what has become a referendum on the United States and its role in the world body. After U.S.-backed Guatemala led or tied in 10 rounds of voting without gaining the necessary two-thirds majority to win, the General Assembly suspended further balloting until today.
WORLD
October 15, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Saturday to impose sanctions on North Korea that are meant to cut off the materials and funding for its nuclear program, although China ruled out participating in inspections of North Korean cargo.
WORLD
October 14, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Security Council plans to vote today on a resolution imposing sanctions on North Korea for its declared nuclear test after a last-minute session to address Chinese and Russian concerns over how to implement them. Tests showing radiation in gases near North Korea dispelled most doubts that the nation had exploded a nuclear device, which had arisen after earlier sampling did not detect any nuclear particles in the air, a U.S. government official said.
WORLD
October 7, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Security Council unanimously urged North Korea on Friday to scrap plans for a nuclear test and return to six-party talks -- or face unspecified consequences. Newly elected Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Friday that the test could come as early as this weekend. U.S. spy satellites have detected sustained activity at a suspected underground test site in North Korea.
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