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United Nations Somalia

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NEWS
June 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.N. forces launched their fiercest strike yet against warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid's military power early today, shelling his headquarters from an American AC-130H Spectre gunship. Helicopters flew cover as the gunship, invisible against the night sky, began a four-hour barrage of 105-millimeter shells at 1:30 a.m. (3:30 p.m. PDT). An official at the White House, asked whether the gunship was striking at Aidid's headquarters, said, "I can confirm that." Aidid's house was surrounded by U.N.
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WORLD
July 30, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Police broke up rallies against the outcome of Kyrgyzstan's recent presidential election, detaining dozens of demonstrators. Opposition activists accuse the government of rigging last week's vote, in which President Kurmanbek Bakiyev won a second term with 76% of the ballots. The Central Asian country hosts a U.S. air base crucial to operations in Afghanistan and has been the focus of competition between Washington and Moscow for regional influence.
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NEWS
February 23, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the public bickering between the United States and the United Nations over Somalia policy in recent weeks, the two sides have evidently reached agreement on a blueprint for the U.N. takeover of military operations from American forces in the ravaged, chaotic East African country. Details will be set down in a report that Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is expected to deliver to the Security Council in a week.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations plan to help Somalia's fledgling government rebuild has been put on hold because of security concerns, said David Stephen, the U.N. representative for Somalia. A draft of the plan was to have been delivered by the end of April, but the March kidnapping of four U.N. employees in Mogadishu, the capital, halted the process, Stephen said. The hostages were released unharmed by their captors, who oppose the government.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brig. Gen. Ikram ul-Hasan, a strapping Pakistani infantry commander, leaned on the podium at U.S. military headquarters in Somalia and, in crisp British English, announced to the world that it was "a great honor and privilege" for him and his 4,761 Pakistani soldiers to take over responsibility for security and stability here in the Somali capital from the U.S. Marines.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the edge of Medina market, about a block from the perimeter of the main military compound America is leaving behind, Mahmoud Mohamed sat at a battered metal table, selling the last of the American garbage that has fed his family and tens of thousands of others for more than a year. They are the leavings of U.S. military MREs--Meals Ready to Eat.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | From Associated Press
The United Nations offered a reward Wednesday for information leading to the capture of Mohammed Farah Aidid, a day after the fugitive warlord virtually dared peacekeepers to try to arrest him. Posters and leaflets carrying a likeness of Aidid beneath the word "wanted" will be tacked up on walls and dropped by helicopters throughout Mogadishu today, U.N. spokesman Barrie Walkley said. The posters and leaflets do not specify the amount of the reward, and Walkley refused to disclose it.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, who humiliated U.S. forces in Mogadishu, has been ousted as chairman of his faction by his former right-hand man, who wants the United Nations and aid agencies to return to help rebuild the nation, faction members said Monday. A vote against the 60-year-old Aidid was taken Sunday at a congress in Mogadishu of the United Somali Congress-Somali National Alliance called by his opponents within the group.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hey you! Lie down! Lie down!" the young Marine shouted, pointing an assault rifle at Ahmed Hussein Fidow's head when it popped up, ever so briefly, to welcome U.S. Marines ashore here. It was Dec. 9, 1992, which seems a lifetime ago--the opening night of a year that went so wrong. But in a little-known scene that was to foreshadow so much, the Marine's warning wasn't enough. "Welcome Marines! Welcome in Mogadishu!" Fidow persisted from his prone position.
NEWS
June 14, 1993 | ART PINE and TODD SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pakistani troops deployed by the United Nations opened fire on civilian demonstrators Sunday, killing at least 14 and perhaps as many as 20, hours before U.N. forces launched a third night of air strikes on the Somali capital. In the 90-minute attack early today, a U.S. AC-130H Spectre gunship joined a force targeting two vehicle storage sites controlled by Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
March 23, 1996 | Associated Press
Villagers rescued five kidnapped aid workers in Somalia in a gun battle that left one village boy in a coma, UNICEF workers said Friday. Police took the 10 kidnappers into custody, said Pierce Gerety, the relief agency's Nairobi-based Somalia representative. The five aid workers--one each from the United States, Britain, Nepal, India and Sudan--were abducted Thursday.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, who humiliated U.S. forces in Mogadishu, has been ousted as chairman of his faction by his former right-hand man, who wants the United Nations and aid agencies to return to help rebuild the nation, faction members said Monday. A vote against the 60-year-old Aidid was taken Sunday at a congress in Mogadishu of the United Somali Congress-Somali National Alliance called by his opponents within the group.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crusted with garbage, festooned with litter, knee-deep in rusting junk, scavenged by packs of wild dogs, blown by dirty sand and scorched by unforgiving sun, a small part of this nation was given back to Somalis on Wednesday. And they were happy to have it. Some slipped in early and hid overnight in abandoned boxes. Hundreds more assembled outside the fence. Then, at dawn, as U.N. tanks retreated from the Mogadishu airport, Somalis swarmed in for a frenzy of looting and gunfighting.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans dug into the sand along a razor-wire perimeter of Mogadishu's beachfront Tuesday. On the other side of the wire coils, an eerie quiet settled over a violent landscape. "It would make anyone wonder if this is the calm before the storm," said Army Special Forces Maj. Bryan Whitman. Under a relentless tropical sun, about 1,800 U.S. Marines and 350 of their Italian counterparts consolidated their hold on the sand of Mogadishu, providing protection for the retreat of U.N.
NEWS
February 10, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon on Thursday outlined plans to deploy several thousand American troops to help evacuate the last U.N. forces in Somalia and to retrieve dozens of U.S. tanks, armored vehicles and helicopters that were on loan to the United Nations. A senior U.S. official said 2,731 Marines accompanied by four Navy warships, attack helicopters and AC-130 gunships will begin providing cover for the departing U.N. forces in about three weeks. The United Nations formally requested U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | Reuters
A group of foreign staff members of the United Nations mission in Somalia were freed Sunday after negotiations with gunmen who took them hostage Saturday, U.N. sources said. The kidnapers had demanded money that they said they were owed by the United Nations. It was not clear on what grounds they had agreed to free the hostages. Among those held was chief transport officer Ray Botham, who was back at work Sunday, apparently unharmed. Somali sources said five people had been held, but a U.N.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations on Saturday announced a major initiative to increase the amount of relief food, agricultural stocks and medical care in famine-stricken Somalia over the next three months. But U.N. officials, speaking here after a two-day fact-finding trip to Somalia, acknowledged that the program's success still depends on the cooperation of the country's warlords and armed gangs in permitting unimpeded movement of supplies out of the key port of Mogadishu and into the countryside.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Missiles fired from American helicopters Wednesday blew up another arms depot and staging compound serving Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid as U.N. forces intensified their efforts to disarm him after the shooting of eight more U.N. soldiers this week. The Pentagon said the attack, which began at 3 p.m., was designed to destroy the compound. It was identified as a staging area for the fatal attacks on two Pakistani soldiers and the wounding of six other U.N.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Up to 30 armed Somalis formerly employed by the United Nations seized about 15 foreign U.N. staff members in Mogadishu Saturday and held them hostage demanding payment. Negotiations were under way to end the blockade at the Southern Compound, a cluster of buildings near the port that is used by international U.N. staff, said Maj. Zubair Chattha, a spokesman for the peacekeeping force in Somalia. The former workers claimed they were owed overtime pay.
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