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United Nations Somalia

NEWS
January 2, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the sun set on the battered Somali town of Baidoa one day this week, 100 U.S. Marines gathered around Los Angeles' Cardinal Roger Mahony for an evening Mass. "You fellows should understand how this is playing back home," Mahony told the Marines, many of whom came from Oxnard, Mission Hills and other cities in the cardinal's own archdiocese. "You're helping these people. And you really should be proud of that. It's having an enormous positive impact," he said.
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NEWS
December 19, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lt. Roy Hollan's machine-gun platoon was backing up a French Foreign Legion reconnaissance mission in a bombed-out neighborhood here a few days ago when his U.S. Marine unit spotted snipers on a rooftop. The Americans raised their weapons, girding for a firefight, until the French commander quickly informed them that the snipers were Legionnaires providing cover for the mission. "Seeing those snipers gave us a start," said Hollan, of Mission Viejo. "We didn't know they (the snipers) were French.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Up to 30 armed Somalis formerly employed by the United Nations seized about 15 foreign U.N. staff members in Mogadishu Saturday and held them hostage demanding payment. Negotiations were under way to end the blockade at the Southern Compound, a cluster of buildings near the port that is used by international U.N. staff, said Maj. Zubair Chattha, a spokesman for the peacekeeping force in Somalia. The former workers claimed they were owed overtime pay.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | Reuters
A group of foreign staff members of the United Nations mission in Somalia were freed Sunday after negotiations with gunmen who took them hostage Saturday, U.N. sources said. The kidnapers had demanded money that they said they were owed by the United Nations. It was not clear on what grounds they had agreed to free the hostages. Among those held was chief transport officer Ray Botham, who was back at work Sunday, apparently unharmed. Somali sources said five people had been held, but a U.N.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials said Wednesday they have reached a "momentous" agreement with a key Somali warlord allowing the deployment of up to 500 armed foreign troops to protect relief shipments coming into the port of Mogadishu. Plagued by violence and looting, the port is a troublesome bottleneck for emergency food and medical supplies for Somalia's more than 6 million people, as many as 1.5 million of whom face famine after years of civil war and drought. The agreement with Gen.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | From Reuters
A United Nations team arrived in the ruined Somali capital Thursday to cheers from crowds of gun-toting teen-agers lining the streets as the U.N. convoy raced to meetings with rival warlords. "They think the U.N. is bringing its army to bring peace to the city," a Somali escorting the team told reporters. Peter Hansen of Denmark and his 23-member team met with self-styled President Ali Mahdi Mohamed, whose vicious feud with Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid has killed and maimed thousands.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | From Reuters
More than 1.5 million Somalis may starve to death unless the world helps the eastern African nation, which has been ravaged by war and drought, a U.N. official said Friday. "Without an immediate injection of support from the international community, the lives of over 1.5 million Somalis are under threat," Ian MacLeod, a U.N. Children's Fund official in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, said in a statement.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sgt. Tyler Johnson, 28, didn't know where Somalia was until he was called to a briefing last week and shown a map. On Thursday, however, he and thousands of other Marines and sailors stationed at Camp Pendleton and El Toro were expecting to spend Christmas in that strife-torn East African country, joining other Pendleton Marines now aboard ships in the Red Sea. No official troop-deployment orders came from the Pentagon during the day, even after the U.N.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration is moving toward agreement on a plan to place Somalia under transitional rule by the United Nations--similar to what is being done in Cambodia--after proposed military operations are over, officials said Wednesday. Although the White House has made no decisions, officials said there is a growing belief in the State Department and National Security Council that the step will be necessary to allow U.S. troops to pull out quickly once the area is secure.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the case of Somalia, the Pentagon once again has won a fight to ensure that an American commands United Nations troops sent into a hostile environment. But America's insistence on exercising full control of such operations is running into growing international opposition. With Washington hoping to scale back its role as the world's policeman and with U.N.
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