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August 7, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one side were almost 500 angry black youths, seething over the police shooting of a man the day before and now determined to march on the local police station. Facing them was a jut-jawed white police colonel, who had a letter from his commander forbidding the march and the firepower to back it up. In the middle was a plump, bespectacled man in a pin-striped suit--Hisham Omayed of the United Nations. "We will talk to the police," Omayed told the crowd.
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NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha said South Africa's white government accepted a U.N. report recommending ways to halt political violence and urging a resumption of talks on non-racial rule. The report was prepared by the U.N. special envoy and veteran U.S. diplomat, Cyrus R. Vance, after a visit to South Africa in late July and approved by U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali Aug. 6.
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NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha said South Africa's white government accepted a U.N. report recommending ways to halt political violence and urging a resumption of talks on non-racial rule. The report was prepared by the U.N. special envoy and veteran U.S. diplomat, Cyrus R. Vance, after a visit to South Africa in late July and approved by U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali Aug. 6.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one side were almost 500 angry black youths, seething over the police shooting of a man the day before and now determined to march on the local police station. Facing them was a jut-jawed white police colonel, who had a letter from his commander forbidding the march and the firepower to back it up. In the middle was a plump, bespectacled man in a pin-striped suit--Hisham Omayed of the United Nations. "We will talk to the police," Omayed told the crowd.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | From Reuters
South African trade union and business leaders said Saturday that they have drawn up a peace charter to revitalize stalled democracy talks and minimize the crippling effect of next month's pro-democracy general strike. A statement by the 1.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, summing up a dramatic round of diplomacy, reported Sunday that the United Nations may play a role in trying to break the South African impasse between President Frederik W. de Klerk and African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela. In an interview at the end of a 10-day visit to Africa and London, Boutros-Ghali said he plans to ask the Security Council this week to send an emissary to South Africa to study the tense situation.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The South African government cleared the way for U.N. observers to monitor pro-democracy protests, but it said international help is of limited use in reviving stalled political negotiations. President Frederik W. de Klerk reiterated that his white-minority administration will not be forced from power by demonstrations planned next week by Nelson Mandela's African National Congress. The ANC has called a general strike for Monday and Tuesday as part of a week of heightened protests.
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders from across the political spectrum in South Africa, desperate for international support, are hailing the U.N. Security Council's decision to send a special envoy here this week as a victory for their respective causes. But the arrival Tuesday of Cyrus R. Vance, the U.N. secretary general's special representative, won't bring an end to the violence that grips South Africa. And it won't even begin to bridge the yawning differences between President Frederik W.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Nations began a huge airlift to repatriate 30,000 South Africans over the next year, with the first flight bringing home 120 political exiles from Tanzania. African National Congress supporters greeted the 120 at Johannesburg airport after the flight from Dar es Salaam arranged by the United Nations' refugee agency. Some exiles have returned home without U.N. support. But up to 30,000 remain in guerrilla bases and farming and education centers in neighboring African states.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The South African government cleared the way for U.N. observers to monitor pro-democracy protests, but it said international help is of limited use in reviving stalled political negotiations. President Frederik W. de Klerk reiterated that his white-minority administration will not be forced from power by demonstrations planned next week by Nelson Mandela's African National Congress. The ANC has called a general strike for Monday and Tuesday as part of a week of heightened protests.
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders from across the political spectrum in South Africa, desperate for international support, are hailing the U.N. Security Council's decision to send a special envoy here this week as a victory for their respective causes. But the arrival Tuesday of Cyrus R. Vance, the U.N. secretary general's special representative, won't bring an end to the violence that grips South Africa. And it won't even begin to bridge the yawning differences between President Frederik W.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | From Reuters
South African trade union and business leaders said Saturday that they have drawn up a peace charter to revitalize stalled democracy talks and minimize the crippling effect of next month's pro-democracy general strike. A statement by the 1.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council on Thursday stepped up efforts to stop the escalating violence in South Africa and reopen the stalled negotiations on the nation's future between the government and black-majority political parties. By unanimous vote, the 15-member council agreed to dispatch a special representative to South Africa to explore ways to end the killing, and it called on all sides to return to the negotiating table, where talks have hit an impasse.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The white-minority South African government and its black opponents squared off in an emergency U.N. Security Council session Wednesday, with Nelson Mandela urging the council to investigate and take steps to end township violence and restart constitutional talks.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, summing up a dramatic round of diplomacy, reported Sunday that the United Nations may play a role in trying to break the South African impasse between President Frederik W. de Klerk and African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela. In an interview at the end of a 10-day visit to Africa and London, Boutros-Ghali said he plans to ask the Security Council this week to send an emissary to South Africa to study the tense situation.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | From Reuters
Reported breaches of a ban on oil for South Africa increased to 64 this year, double last year's total, as a global oil glut and an adequate supply of ships adversely affected the boycott, a U.N. panel said Tuesday. The 11-nation group set up by the General Assembly to monitor observance of the embargo recommended urgent measures to impose a mandatory ban through Security Council action.
NEWS
February 7, 1989
Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe called for tougher economic sanctions on South Africa and urged the United Nations to increase the strength of its peacekeeping force for Namibia. Mugabe told the eight-nation Commonwealth Committee on South Africa, meeting to seek ways to increase external pressure on Pretoria, that the international campaign for sanctions must be intensified.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Nations began a huge airlift to repatriate 30,000 South Africans over the next year, with the first flight bringing home 120 political exiles from Tanzania. African National Congress supporters greeted the 120 at Johannesburg airport after the flight from Dar es Salaam arranged by the United Nations' refugee agency. Some exiles have returned home without U.N. support. But up to 30,000 remain in guerrilla bases and farming and education centers in neighboring African states.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
South Africa and the United Nations on Friday cleared the way for thousands of South Africans who fled apartheid to return home. Douglas Stafford, deputy U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, and Pretoria's ambassador to Geneva, Leslie Manley, initialed an agreement granting an amnesty for political crimes to an estimated 40,000 exiles. "This agreement marks the beginning of the end of a 30-year-long human tragedy," U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Sadako Ogata said in a statement from Japan.
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