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NEWS
October 19, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo called Tuesday for a peace conference between North and South Korea, with the United States, the Soviet Union, China and Japan also taking part. Making the first address ever by a South Korean leader to the U.N. General Assembly, Roh offered to sign a treaty of nonaggression or non-use of force, an idea that North Korea has suggested frequently in the past but that the south has always rejected.
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NEWS
September 18, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking sign of the Cold War's end, seven nations, including the three Baltic states and the two divided Koreas, joined the United Nations on Tuesday. All had been barred admission previously by the U.S.-Soviet competition. The new president of the U.N. General Assembly, Saudi Ambassador Samir S. Shihabi, declared the new members admitted by acclamation after last week's approval by the Security Council.
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NEWS
September 22, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual compromise, U.S., Soviet and Chinese diplomats agreed Wednesday to include a debate on Korean unification in the General Assembly, with representatives of both north and south invited to address the world body for the first time.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Security Council approved without a vote a resolution recommending U.N. membership for longtime antagonists North and South Korea. Both will be formally admitted by the General Assembly at the start of its annual session Sept. 17. The council attributed its decision to the two countries' willingness to "put aside their differences in favor of their shared interest in promoting the well-being of their peoples and of the world in general."
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking sign of the Cold War's end, seven nations, including the three Baltic states and the two divided Koreas, joined the United Nations on Tuesday. All had been barred admission previously by the U.S.-Soviet competition. The new president of the U.N. General Assembly, Saudi Ambassador Samir S. Shihabi, declared the new members admitted by acclamation after last week's approval by the Security Council.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Towering above the North Korean capital of Pyongyang stands a dramatic symbol of grandiose dreams unfulfilled: the 105-story, pyramid-shaped steel and concrete shell of the Ryugyong Hotel. The empty skyscraper remains "absolutely the same as in 1989," noted a recent European visitor to Pyongyang, who spoke on condition of anonymity. "Some say they don't have the money, and some say they don't have the technology, to finish it."
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communist North Korea, taking a step toward possible relaxation of tensions on the Korean Peninsula, said Tuesday that it will apply for United Nations membership at the same time that South Korea does. The capitalist government in Seoul had previously announced plans to seek U.N. membership this year and had urged North Korea to apply also.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Security Council approved without a vote a resolution recommending U.N. membership for longtime antagonists North and South Korea. Both will be formally admitted by the General Assembly at the start of its annual session Sept. 17. The council attributed its decision to the two countries' willingness to "put aside their differences in favor of their shared interest in promoting the well-being of their peoples and of the world in general."
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The North and South Korean prime ministers met today to pave the road to Korean unity, but each side apparently rejected the other's main proposals and agreed to meet again Thursday. South Korean Prime Minister Kang Young Hoon joined his northern counterpart, Yon Hyong Muk, for the two-hour session. Kang proposed that the Koreas allow cross-border travel on major holidays, restore communications and travel links, reunite families and reduce armed forces to equal levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1991
Until the late 19th Century the Western world knew Korea as the Hermit Kingdom, a shadowy land whose rulers shunned nearly all contacts with the world outside. Modern South Korea, a major trading nation, has long since eagerly sought expanded international relations. By contrast North Korea, ruled for more than 40 years by the Stalinist Kim Il Sung, clings to isolationism, sealing its people off from outside influences as one means of maintaining a rigorous ideological control.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communist North Korea, taking a step toward possible relaxation of tensions on the Korean Peninsula, said Tuesday that it will apply for United Nations membership at the same time that South Korea does. The capitalist government in Seoul had previously announced plans to seek U.N. membership this year and had urged North Korea to apply also.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Towering above the North Korean capital of Pyongyang stands a dramatic symbol of grandiose dreams unfulfilled: the 105-story, pyramid-shaped steel and concrete shell of the Ryugyong Hotel. The empty skyscraper remains "absolutely the same as in 1989," noted a recent European visitor to Pyongyang, who spoke on condition of anonymity. "Some say they don't have the money, and some say they don't have the technology, to finish it."
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo called Tuesday for a peace conference between North and South Korea, with the United States, the Soviet Union, China and Japan also taking part. Making the first address ever by a South Korean leader to the U.N. General Assembly, Roh offered to sign a treaty of nonaggression or non-use of force, an idea that North Korea has suggested frequently in the past but that the south has always rejected.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual compromise, U.S., Soviet and Chinese diplomats agreed Wednesday to include a debate on Korean unification in the General Assembly, with representatives of both north and south invited to address the world body for the first time.
WORLD
April 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
North Korea said Thursday that the United States should dismantle all potential nuclear threats in the region before it would discuss giving up its own nuclear program, and it demanded to be treated equally in disarmament talks. "Now that we have become a nuclear power, the six-party talks should be disarmament talks where participants can solve the issue on an equal basis," a North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman said in a statement carried by the North's official Korean Central News Agency.
WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL - Despite earlier reports of technical difficulties, North Korea launched a long-range rocket Wednesday, and initial reports indicated that in this fourth attempt since 1998, the regime in Pyongyang successfully deployed a satellite into orbit. If so, it would be a huge publicity coup for the new young leader, Kim Jong Un, and an embarrassment for rival South Korea, which has yet to establish a presence in space. The launch also caused some chagrin among intelligence analysts who were apparently misled by an announcement over the weekend that the missile launch would be delayed until later this month because of a technical glitch.
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