Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Nations Taiwan
IN THE NEWS

United Nations Taiwan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Taiwanese government, under threat of U.S. trade sanctions, said that it will comply with a United Nations ban on fishing with enormous drift nets in the northern Pacific Ocean. Taiwan said it will comply by next July 1 with the ban on use of what environmentalists have been calling "curtains of death." The huge nets can stretch across as much as 30 miles of ocean, killing all marine life in their path. "In the past, we said we respected the U.N.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Taiwanese government, under threat of U.S. trade sanctions, said that it will comply with a United Nations ban on fishing with enormous drift nets in the northern Pacific Ocean. Taiwan said it will comply by next July 1 with the ban on use of what environmentalists have been calling "curtains of death." The huge nets can stretch across as much as 30 miles of ocean, killing all marine life in their path. "In the past, we said we respected the U.N.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1994
Robert Kasten's column (Commentary, Dec. 27) provides a thoughtful analysis of why the United States should support Taiwan's participation in the United Nations. The residents of the Republic of China on Taiwan have worked very hard to accomplish remarkable economic, political and social changes over the past 40 years. Taipei has shared its success by providing economic aid to Latin American, African and other Asian countries. Even Washington has encouraged Taipei to participate in multilateral efforts to promote global prosperity.
OPINION
May 16, 2004 | David DeVoss, David DeVoss writes about Asian trade and politics for the East-West News Service in Los Angeles.
As the United States inches painfully toward its goal of a democratic Iraq, many of its coalition allies are heading for the exits. Spain's abrupt departure was quickly followed by the withdrawal of Honduras. The Dominican Republic's contingent is packing its bags, Poland's new government is moving quietly toward the door, and Thailand has said it will leave if any of its soldiers are attacked.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chen Chien-nan, the dapper president of a textile company, represents a historic shift in relations between his native Taiwan and its longtime archenemy, the People's Republic of China. Four years ago, the 53-year-old Taiwanese industrialist spent $50 million and moved his business from Taipei, the capital of Taiwan, to Fuzhou on the Chinese mainland.
OPINION
November 14, 1999 | Greg Mastel, Greg Mastel is director of the Global Economic Policy Project at the New America Foundation and author of "The Rise of the Chinese Economy."
Americans tend to judge U.S. foreign policy from the perspective of fostering American values. The United States militarily intervenes in Kosovo, Rwanda, Haiti and other spots around the globe to fight oppression and restore order. Whether from the right or left, they define foreign-policy objectives in terms of promoting democracy and human rights in regions from Latin America to East Timor to the former Soviet empire. When U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1993 | ROBERT W. KASTEN JR., Robert W. Kasten Jr. (R-Wis.) was a U.S. senator from 1981 to 1993.
The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Seattle last month demonstrates one thing above all else: that 15 diverse Pacific Rim governments can set aside their respective differences long enough to constructively address common objectives. Too bad that all 15 cannot also deliberate together within the larger forum of the United Nations.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Chinese President Jiang Zemin met for nearly two hours Tuesday in talks that produced no immediate results but that, according to U.S. officials, helped to smooth the rocky relationship between the two countries. It was "a very good, very positive meeting, certainly the best of the three meetings [Clinton] has had [with Jiang] to date," White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry told reporters afterward.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
By ties of blood and trade and geography, foreign policy in California looks to the Pacific. Mexico, countries to its south and Asia are the largest sources of immigration into California. The six largest markets for California exports are all nations that border the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
A man burns himself to death in Taipei rather than surrender to police to face charges of sedition. News of his death rocks Chinese communities worldwide, and a martyr is born. In the San Gabriel Valley, supporters of Nan-jung Cheng, a leader in the Taiwan independence movement, are still recovering from shock over his death April 7. "I couldn't sleep," Walnut resident Joshua Su said of his reaction upon hearing the news. Su was one of more than 300 Cheng admirers, from Hacienda Heights to Irvine, who gathered in El Monte last weekend for a memorial service.
NEWS
January 23, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a 1988 magazine column, Republican presidential contender Steve Forbes called the influential religious conservative leader Pat Robertson a "toothy flake." In another column three years earlier, Forbes disparaged proposals to crack down on illegal immigrants by sanctioning employers who hired them. "An important portion of this country's prosperity," Forbes wrote, "is now dependent on illegals. . . . The American Southwest would suffer a depression without them."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|