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NEWS
August 23, 1987
The United States, objecting to the cost and agenda of a three-week U.N. conference, will not take part because it "thinks the international community should consider disarmament and development as two distinct issues," said Anne Stoddard, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. The United States also is urging a cut in spending for the International Conference on Disarmament and Development, estimated at $1.2 million.
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NEWS
August 3, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid worries that a seemingly isolationist United States won't have an ambassador or a dues bill stamped "paid" when the U.N. General Assembly reconvenes next month, the Bush administration says it is pushing to have both. Washington has been without a U.N. ambassador since former President Clinton's appointee, Richard Holbrooke, stepped down in January after getting Congress to agree to pay the bulk of more than $1 billion in back dues. His replacement has been a long time coming.
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NEWS
December 30, 1989 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The General Assembly on Friday denounced the U.S. invasion of Panama by a vote of 75 to 20, with 40 abstentions, in what was seen nonetheless as a surprisingly strong measure of support for Washington. The resolution, sponsored by Cuba and Nicaragua, also called for immediate withdrawal of U.S. forces from Panama.
NEWS
August 1, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By threatening to boycott a U.N. conference on racism, the Bush administration is protesting efforts to equate Zionism with racism and to demand reparations for slavery. But critics say the tactic could backfire, isolating the United States from an international forum that will take place regardless. Although most human rights advocates agree with the administration's objections to the agenda, they are split on the wisdom of a boycott, with some urging the U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
A broad range of nations, including several of Washington's chief allies, on Tuesday harshly criticized a U.S. decision to close the Palestine Liberation Organization's office in New York. The critics charged that the congressionally directed move casts doubt on Washington's credibility as a mediator in the Mideast peace process and jeopardizes the integrity of the United Nations.
NEWS
May 27, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A British diplomat and a German diplomat left their U.N. missions in New York a week ago and made a rare appearance on Capitol Hill in Washington in hopes, they said, of talking some sense into Congress about the United Nations. Their mission was low-key--they met only with congressional staffers, not with senators and representatives--but they left as troubled as they came. "The perception in Congress is different, and it is very difficult to change that perception," the German diplomat said.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | ANTHONY DAY, TIMES SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
Iraq's invasion of Kuwait has brought about a striking change in the American government's attitude toward international law. President Bush has repeatedly invoked Saddam Hussein's violations of international law in justifying a forceful response. And he has repeatedly turned for help to the United Nations Security Council, which has passed 10 resolutions condemning Iraq. The Bush Administration this week is pressing for another resolution that would permit the use of arms against Iraq.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Underscoring growing strains between traditional allies, the United States voted Wednesday to support a U.N. Security Council resolution deploring the refusal of Israel to allow a U.N. mission to visit Jerusalem to investigate the killing of 21 Palestinians earlier this month. It was the second time in less than two weeks that the Bush Administration has sided against Israel in the Security Council. On Oct.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, in his first major statement of foreign policy principles, said Monday that despite America's preoccupation with domestic economic affairs, it will remain actively engaged in the wider world. But in virtually the same breath, Clinton sought to set limits for U.S. involvement in distant conflicts and humanitarian disasters, saying that American participation will be constrained by questions of cost, command and national interest.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council cleared the last legal obstacle Friday for President Clinton's dispatch of American troops to Bosnia, but the U.N. body acted only after a startling and bitter clash between U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright and Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali. In the confrontation behind closed doors, Boutros-Ghali denounced Albright's criticism of his report on Croatia as shocking in its "vulgarity."
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities violated international law when they failed to grant consular services to two German brothers put to death in Arizona in 1999 and ignored a U.N. court order to stay one of the executions, the court ruled here Wednesday.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
Summoned by one of the harshest critics of the United Nations, all 15 members of the Security Council trooped to Washington on Thursday to exchange views--and display pique--with members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who invited the council members to the Capitol after scolding them on their own turf two months ago, urged panel members and the visiting diplomats to "agree to disagree agreeably." Mostly, they did that.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Jesse Helms, one of the United Nations' severest critics, told the Security Council exactly what he thought of the U.N. and its place in the world in a speech Thursday that he admitted was not in "the elegant and rarefied language of the diplomatic trade." The North Carolina Republican, who in the past has called the U.N. community "dysfunctional" and "crybabies," said he came to extend a "hand of friendship."
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the halls of the United Nations, the news that Congress has finally agreed to pay at least part of America's long-standing debt to the world body was cause for cautious celebration. "Right. The check is in the mail, and it will take three years to get here," said a European diplomat. "Maybe by then America will have convinced the rest of us that it's a good deal." For the U.S., it's a billion-dollar bargain.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police stopped traffic for nearly a mile in the rain, a flock of Secret Service agents were ready to take a bullet, and the secretary-general of the United Nations stood at attention, all for the man who leads the world's biggest deadbeat nation. President Clinton still has plenty of political capital at the United Nations. But it has been 13 years since the U.S. began withholding its dues here in an attempt to force the U.N.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | From Reuters
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Thursday said he was disappointed that the United States had not chosen to pay more than $1 billion in financial arrears to the world body, saying Washington should not expect "representation without taxation." Annan told a news conference at the end of a three-day visit to Tokyo that he was disappointed that the United States failed this week to pass legislation concerning payment toward the $1.3 billion that the United Nations says the U.S.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Walking a fine philosophical line in the first United Nations speech of his Administration, President Bush proclaimed the defeat of Marxism on Monday but, at the same time, he carefully avoided criticism of the Soviet Union or its leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. "Today is freedom's moment," Bush declared in a speech that often echoed the ideological rhetoric of the early years of his predecessor, Ronald Reagan, but skirted the former President's harsh Cold War characterizations of Soviet policy.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | ART PINE and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union appears to be prepared to co-sponsor a new U.S. attempt to overturn a 1975 U.N. resolution that equated Zionism with racism, senior Bush Administration officials said Sunday. The move, while mostly symbolic in its impact, would be a conspicuous example of U.S.-Soviet diplomatic cooperation and a major step toward resumption of diplomatic relations between the Soviet Union and Israel.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | BOB DROGIN and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will contribute enough money to the United Nations to retain its vote in the General Assembly next year, but developments on Capitol Hill ensure that it will not begin to repay its enormous debt to the world body, U.S. and U.N. officials said Friday. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who is widely considered a U.S. ally and is usually extremely guarded in his public comments, reacted bitterly to reports that Washington will not do anything this year to address its U.N.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After exchanging barbs in public over a controversial U.S. sting operation on Mexican soil, President Clinton and Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo met in private Monday and issued a statement pledging "improved cooperation and mutual trust with full respect for the sovereignty of both nations." But the statement contained no American apology for Operation Casablanca, the money-laundering sting, nor any Mexican promise to refrain from attempting to prosecute U.S.
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