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NEWS
April 15, 1987
Pope John Paul II will speak to the U.N. General Assembly at the end of his tour of the United States in September, diplomatic sources said. New York was not mentioned on the official itinerary for the Pope's visit, which is to begin in Miami on Sept. 10 and wind up in Detroit on Sept. 19, but U.N. sources said that his address before the 159-nation delegation has been tentatively scheduled for Sept. 19. The Pope last spoke to the General Assembly in October, 1979.
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NEWS
April 16, 1987
The U.S. Catholic Conference has denied a report that Pope John Paul II will speak to the U.N. General Assembly in New York at the end of his U.S. tour this September. "This is not true," William Ryan, a spokesman for the Catholic conference said. "We have no indication whatsoever that he will speak to the General Assembly. The Pope will be in Detroit on Sept. 19 and will not leave until that evening, when he is scheduled to depart for Rome."
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NEWS
September 23, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak, and Pope John Paul II reluctantly heeded his doctors Thursday, scrapping a scheduled October trip to the United States and a speech to the United Nations. The Vatican called it a postponement and said the Pope needs more time to fully recover from surgery last spring to repair a broken right leg. Still, the cancellation can only serve to fuel rumors already rife at the Vatican that the 74-year-old pontiff is in failing health.
OPINION
October 17, 2003 | Daniel C. Maguire, Daniel C. Maguire is a professor of moral theology at Marquette University.
When Karol Wojtyla assumed the papacy 25 years ago, my hopes were high. A vibrant, non-Italian pope who still went skiing and who wrote and acted in plays might be independent enough to break the mold and reshape the papacy in humbler and more helpful ways. This hope was shared by people in other religions who saw the advantage of a prominent religious leader who could give voice to the best moral hopes of humankind. This promise was never fulfilled.
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