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June 30, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by reports of heavy civilian casualties and dangerous shortages of water, the U.N. Security Council demanded Wednesday that the government of Yemen halt its offensive against the main rebel city of Aden on the edge of the Arabian Peninsula. But the Security Council, in a resolution approved unanimously, took no action to punish the government of Yemen or to attempt to stop the 2-month-old civil war by force.
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NEWS
June 30, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by reports of heavy civilian casualties and dangerous shortages of water, the U.N. Security Council demanded Wednesday that the government of Yemen halt its offensive against the main rebel city of Aden on the edge of the Arabian Peninsula. But the Security Council, in a resolution approved unanimously, took no action to punish the government of Yemen or to attempt to stop the 2-month-old civil war by force.
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NEWS
November 23, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, in his quest for a new U.N. resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq, failed to win the support of Yemen, the only Arab nation presently on the U.N. Security Council, during a five-hour visit here Thursday. "We knew it was going to be a very tough nut," a senior U.S. official said later. "But Secretary Baker is not at all disappointed or discouraged by the visit. They (the Yemenis) did not say no."
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, in his quest for a new U.N. resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq, failed to win the support of Yemen, the only Arab nation presently on the U.N. Security Council, during a five-hour visit here Thursday. "We knew it was going to be a very tough nut," a senior U.S. official said later. "But Secretary Baker is not at all disappointed or discouraged by the visit. They (the Yemenis) did not say no."
WORLD
June 1, 2011 | By Iona Craig, Los Angeles Times
Yemen's capital and other cities again erupted into violent chaos Tuesday after a cease-fire collapsed between forces loyal to President Ali Abdullah Saleh and tribal fighters, who seized at least four government buildings. The heavy fighting in Sana began late Monday evening as Saleh's Republican Guard troops and supporters of his rival tribal chief Sadiq Ahmar pounded each other in fresh clashes. Mortar-shell explosions and gunfire ripped the air early Tuesday. South of Sana, security forces opened fire on demonstrators in the city of Taiz, bringing the death toll there since Sunday to 50, according to reports received by the United Nations.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | DONNA ABU-NASR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nora Ahmed was on her honeymoon when her father cut off her head and paraded it down a dusty Cairo street because she had married a man of whom he did not approve. Begum Gadhaki was sleeping next to her 3-month-old son when her husband grabbed a gun and shot her dead. A neighbor had spotted a man who was not a family member near the field where she was working in Pakistan's Sindh province.
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