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SPORTS
July 22, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five days of deliberation, the United Nations decided Tuesday that its resolution prohibiting sports contacts with Yugoslavia allows individual athletes from that country, but not teams, to compete in the Summer Olympics. The United Nations "will inform the government of Spain that under no circumstances can (Yugoslav athletes) gather or participate in any kind of team gathering whatsoever," spokesman Matthew Nerzig said.
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NEWS
July 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Chanting "Treason!" and "Let's rise up!" about 15,000 supporters of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic rallied Monday to protest his extradition to the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague. The rally, held in front of the federal parliament by supporters of Milosevic's Socialist Party of Serbia and the ultranationalist Serbian Radical Party, was the biggest of three pro-Milosevic protests organized since his extradition Thursday.
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NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Serbian-dominated remnants of Yugoslavia's presidency on Friday accused the European Community of backing the dismantling of the country and urged the United Nations to do more to halt the civil war. But Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said continuing fighting in the 6-month-old civil war prevents dispatch of U.N. peacekeepers to Yugoslavia. The federal army launched an intense artillery barrage on Karlovac, 30 miles southwest of Zagreb, the Croatian capital.
NEWS
July 1, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was spirited out of Belgrade by U.N. authorities last week, he reportedly displayed the same unmasked contempt for the international war crimes tribunal that he has since it was created eight years ago.
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.N. Security Council sent a new warning Thursday to Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic over reported atrocities in Kosovo, and White House National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger indicated that U.S. and other NATO aircraft could strike targets in the breakaway Serbian province in a matter of days. In Washington, Berger said the U.S. could begin assigning aircraft to participate in airstrikes as soon as today.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | PAUL WATSON and SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Yugoslav army is making ominous threats that it will force its way back into Kosovo if the United Nations doesn't soon deliver on a promise to let some Serbian soldiers and police return to the southern province. Angered by almost daily attacks on Serbs and other ethnic minorities in Kosovo, the Yugoslav military accuses the U.N. and NATO-led peacekeepers of violating the June peace accord that ended the war over Kosovo.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali faced jeering crowds, impatient officials and irate local journalists on a swift tour of besieged Sarajevo on Thursday. But he refused to budge from his view that only more talk--not outside force--will bring Serbian aggression to an end. It was a day when the professorial U.N. leader, dressed in a flak jacket and blue helmet, tried to beat back the waves of emotion in the bloodied Bosnian capital with cold logic. But he did not seem to succeed.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | From Associated Press
Sarajevo's Muslim-led defenders waged a desperate and costly offensive Tuesday to break the five-month Serb siege of the city, where dwindling supplies of clean water raised fears of epidemics. The attacks--launched on the eve of a new round of peace talks--failed to punch through Bosnian Serb lines and left many casualties. A U.N. official estimated one Bosnian fighter was lost for each six feet of ground gained.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Bosnia's rival groups stepped up their fight for key districts of Sarajevo on Saturday, just hours after U.N. peacekeepers managed to get their military commanders to sit down together for talks. Machine-gun and mortar fire rattled through the city's western suburbs overnight as Serbian forces appeared to be trying to link up with units in the north of the city. Sarajevo radio said Serbs bombarded the suburb of Dobrinja at dawn Saturday.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through much of the 1990s, travel agencies in Kosovo ran a lucrative but risky underground banking system, transferring money from ethnic Albanian workers abroad back to their relatives here in Kosovo. The back-channel system was a product of distrust of Serb-controlled Yugoslav banks, tight controls on the export of foreign currency and big risks involved in carrying large sums of money into Kosovo--with the omnipresent threat that police or customs officials would confiscate the cash.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reformist majority in the Yugoslav Cabinet, overriding resistance from coalition partners and fierce criticism from political opponents, rammed through a decree Saturday authorizing the transfer of war crimes suspects to the U.N. tribunal in The Hague. That endorsement set the stage for the transfer of 16 indictees, including former President Slobodan Milosevic, to begin in a "matter of days," Deputy Prime Minister Miroljub Labus told a news conference.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | Associated Press
A defiant Slobodan Milosevic refused to accept an arrest warrant from the U.N. war crimes tribunal Thursday, a day after the court threatened Yugoslavia with sanctions for failing to serve it. The warrant and a list of war crimes charges against the former president were delivered to Belgrade's Central Prison, where Milosevic has been held since his arrest April 1.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British and Yugoslav officials gave support Wednesday to a possible international compromise under which imprisoned former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic would first face trial at home, then be transferred to the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague. "I think it is quite right that Mr. Milosevic should be held to account . . .
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vojislav Kostunica on Tuesday sharply rejected international pressure on Yugoslavia to quickly deliver arrested former President Slobodan Milosevic to a U.N. war crimes tribunal. Kostunica told a news conference here that Yugoslavia is willing to cooperate with the tribunal to some degree but will not subordinate its national dignity for "a handful of dollars" in aid by handing the former president over to the panel in The Hague.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | Associated Press
Criticizing Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica for dismissing her court's claim to Slobodan Milosevic, the chief U.N. war crimes prosecutor rejected calls that the former president first stand trial at home. Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte said she remained "cautiously optimistic" that Milosevic would be extradited to the Netherlands-based tribunal so that the U.N. court can try him on suspicion of involvement in atrocities against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | From Reuters
Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica said Thursday that he will meet with chief U.N. war crimes prosecutor Carla del Ponte when she visits here next week. The president's change of heart is likely to please Western governments, but they may be alarmed that he also suggested he will make public any secret indictments that Del Ponte hands over to him from the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | From a Times staff writer
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said Tuesday that a customs duty imposed by the government of Macedonia is blocking aid to Kosovo and that supplies are not reaching people badly needing help. "The fee, which was announced in mid-July by the [Macedonian] government, has brought UNHCR's aid pipeline to a standstill and is contributing to a backup of supplies," a U.N. spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As his colleagues in Belgrade struggled over details of a plan to end the NATO bombing destroying their country, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United Nations sped through Ventura and other cities Thursday on a Southern California speaking tour. Traveling in a white Saturn with an old college chum, Ambassador Vladislav Jovanovic gave speeches to an occasionally hostile group in Montecito and a world affairs group in Westlake Village.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
In an emotional farewell speech Friday, the top U.N. administrator in Kosovo begged the leaders of the province's various ethnic groups to bring an end to violence. "My final message to you is simple: Stop the killings, my dear friends. Stop the violence," Bernard Kouchner said, addressing the officials seated in a sports hall in Pristina, Kosovo's provincial capital. "There were already too many victims on this land. There was too much suffering in the last months and years," he added. U.N.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Danish Defense Minister Hans Haekkerup will succeed Bernard Kouchner of France in mid-January as the U.N. administrator in Kosovo, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan announced. Kouchner has served as U.N. administrator since the United Nations and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization took control of Kosovo in June 1999 after the Western alliance's 78-day air war against Yugoslavia.
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