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United Neighbors Of Temple Beaudry

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was anger that finally overcame the fear and turned Mauricia Miranda into a leader. The 44-year-old native of Mexico and mother of nine children said she was afraid at first to even talk with the Anglo men in dark suits who represented the wealthy landowners planning to rebuild her downtown neighborhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was anger that finally overcame the fear and turned Mauricia Miranda into a leader. The 44-year-old native of Mexico and mother of nine children said she was afraid at first to even talk with the Anglo men in dark suits who represented the wealthy landowners planning to rebuild her downtown neighborhood.
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REAL ESTATE
February 25, 1990
Congratulations are due the United Neighbors of Temple Beaudry and City West for negotiating $6.5 million to create 80 units of affordable housing within 3 miles of Watt's City Center West, and linked to that 1,610,000 square foot project ("Model for the Future" by David M. Kinchen, Feb. 4). It is high time for ". . . the first project in the area (with) . . . approval linked to replacement low-income housing." But it simply isn't enough. L.A. 2000 says: "As Los Angeles becomes more job-rich, it will also become housing poor . . . this imbalance could increase the number of vehicle hours travelled by more than 300%."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991
When--and if--the Central City West project in downtown Los Angeles is finally completed, at least 25 years will have passed since it was first proposed. So the City Council took only one step in a long journey when it gave the massive project the go-ahead Tuesday. Still, given the controversy that attends most "growth" these days, there was remarkable unanimity among the parties involved. That's encouraging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1994 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A student walkout across Los Angeles County planned for Nov. 2 touched off debate Tuesday among Proposition 187 opponents about whether cutting class is the best way to protest the possibility of diminished access to public education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1991 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved development plans for an innovative 465-acre "self-contained urban village" adjacent to downtown that will include a core of office towers and shops encircled by 18,000 dwellings for the affluent and poor alike. Central City West, the largest revitalization ever attempted downtown without public redevelopment funds, was hailed by federal and state officials as a model for tackling housing, transportation and growth problems.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
Although the Los Angeles Board of Education will proceed with plans to buy a 24-acre site in Temple-Beaudry for a new school, many residents still oppose the idea of putting another school in their neighborhood. At a recent community meeting, board member Vickie Castro proposed a mixed-use plan that would set aside four acres for housing around the proposed school site, bounded by Toluca and Colton streets, Beverly Boulevard and Beaudry Avenue, across the street from Belmont High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1997 | AMY PYLE and PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saying further delays would be "unconscionable," Los Angeles school board President Jeff Horton led the drive Monday to approve the Belmont Learning Center, but the board left in limbo a decision about how to pay for the $87-million high school. The vote to contract with Kajima International to build the campus west of downtown went forward after two unions suing the district over the plan failed to gain a temporary restraining order earlier in the day that would have blocked a vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
Partially persuaded by a band of Latino neighbors ringing their hearing chamber with a string of 900 post cards, the city Planning Commission on Thursday set strict requirements for replacing razed low-income housing before approving the first phase of a controversial $600-million office complex. The Watt City Center is to be built downtown, west of the Harbor Freeway between 7th and 8th streets by developer Ray Watt, for whom it is named.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overcrowding at Los Angeles secondary schools has become so acute that the district is considering converting up to 25 campuses to multitrack schedules to alleviate a projected shortage of 8,600 seats for the coming school year. Setting up portable classrooms at crowded junior and senior high schools was another option included in a report presented Monday to the Los Angeles Board of Education. Schools were also urged to submit creative proposals to solve the space crunch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1996 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Los Angeles Board of Education contracted with a development consortium Monday to build its first full-service high school in two decades, despite lingering questions about how the project would be financed. If progress continues as planned, the Belmont Learning Center could open within three years on a 35-acre lot northwest of downtown. The 3,600-student school and its domino effect--in which Belmont High would become a middle school--would keep thousands of students off of buses.
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