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United Network For Organ Sharing Organization

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NEWS
June 25, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The network that distributes organs for transplants, under pressure from the federal government, agreed Thursday to give the sickest patients in any given region first priority for scarce livers. The new policy, announced by the nonprofit United Network for Organ Sharing, does not go as far as the Department of Health and Human Services would like--a no-boundary nationwide system for distribution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2006 | Christian Berthelsen and Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writers
UCI Medical Center is facing sanctions from the organization that manages the nation's organ transplant system, including one that could force the hospital to close its kidney transplant unit, according to people familiar with the matter. Medical center executives flew to Chicago last week to meet with a subcommittee of the United Network for Organ Sharing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2006 | Christian Berthelsen and Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writers
UCI Medical Center is facing sanctions from the organization that manages the nation's organ transplant system, including one that could force the hospital to close its kidney transplant unit, according to people familiar with the matter. Medical center executives flew to Chicago last week to meet with a subcommittee of the United Network for Organ Sharing.
NEWS
April 5, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday rejected the Clinton administration's controversial plan to offer transplant organs to the sickest patients first, regardless of where they live. In a largely partisan 275-147 vote, the Republican-controlled House instead approved a measure that would return to a policy of distributing organs to medically eligible patients in a local area first, in order of need, before being offered regionally and then nationally.
NEWS
April 5, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday rejected the Clinton administration's controversial plan to offer transplant organs to the sickest patients first, regardless of where they live. In a largely partisan 275-147 vote, the Republican-controlled House instead approved a measure that would return to a policy of distributing organs to medically eligible patients in a local area first, in order of need, before being offered regionally and then nationally.
NEWS
November 16, 1996 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Within the next day or two, Dr. Ronald Busuttil will sit down and compose a letter to the 250-plus patients on UCLA Medical Center's liver transplant waiting list to explain why some of them will no longer be considered favored candidates for the life-saving operation. He is not looking forward to the task.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
Last December, doctors told Norman C. Franzen, 75, of Villa Park that he had 2 1/2 months to live. But this week, he was exercising at a gym, feeling great and looking forward to many more years. Franzen said he owes his life to the pioneering "alternative heart program" at UCLA Medical Center. The program makes use of donor hearts that are older as well as those in need of surgical repair--hearts usually rejected for younger transplant recipients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the spring of 1992, Gianna Marie Laiola was fighting a rare kidney disorder that was slowly sapping her strength and dashing all her hopes. Her kidneys were failing fast and she had to undergo daily dialysis treatment. Her appetite was gone and she constantly felt tired. Today, Gianna, 17, is a star high school athlete, a straight "A" student and her dreams have been restored. Her life made a remarkable turnaround four years ago this month when she was given a kidney transplant.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The network that distributes organs for transplants, under pressure from the federal government, agreed Thursday to give the sickest patients in any given region first priority for scarce livers. The new policy, announced by the nonprofit United Network for Organ Sharing, does not go as far as the Department of Health and Human Services would like--a no-boundary nationwide system for distribution.
NEWS
November 16, 1996 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Within the next day or two, Dr. Ronald Busuttil will sit down and compose a letter to the 250-plus patients on UCLA Medical Center's liver transplant waiting list to explain why some of them will no longer be considered favored candidates for the life-saving operation. He is not looking forward to the task.
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