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United Paperworkers International Union

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BUSINESS
September 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge Rules in Favor of United Paperworkers: A National Labor Relations Board judge has ordered International Paper Co. to pay as much as $40 million in lost wages to 1,200 union members who were locked out of the company's Mobile, Ala., mill in 1987. Officials of the United Paperworkers International Union said the decision was the largest award ever granted the union. The dispute stemmed from an IP decision to lock employees out of its Mobile mill during a contract disagreement in March, 1987.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Staley Union Members Ratify Contract: The ratification by locked-out union workers at A.E. Staley Mfg. Co. ends a labor dispute that dates to 1992 when the United Paperworkers International Union rejected a proposed contract. Officials of the Paperworkers union say the pact was approved by a 285-226 vote. Workers will have 45 days to decide whether they want to return to work or accept severance packages.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Staley Union Members Ratify Contract: The ratification by locked-out union workers at A.E. Staley Mfg. Co. ends a labor dispute that dates to 1992 when the United Paperworkers International Union rejected a proposed contract. Officials of the Paperworkers union say the pact was approved by a 285-226 vote. Workers will have 45 days to decide whether they want to return to work or accept severance packages.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On this city's northeast side, where strip shopping centers give way to smokestacks and cornfields, 22nd Street is the demarcation line for a global battle on three fronts. It's where 4,000 workers--7% of the local work force--have set up picket lines to protest their treatment by three multinational employers: one Japanese, one British and one American.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On this city's northeast side, where strip shopping centers give way to smokestacks and cornfields, 22nd Street is the demarcation line for a global battle on three fronts. It's where 4,000 workers--7% of the local work force--have set up picket lines to protest their treatment by three multinational employers: one Japanese, one British and one American.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
Here on the banks of the Androscoggin River, in the dense woods of western Maine, David battled Goliath and lost. The fight was for more than jobs. It was for the soul of an old mill town and for the right of a hired hand to set a value on his own labor. The battle ended quietly and unexpectedly the other day with no concessions and no consensus. But if there is one point on which everyone agrees, it is that the long, bitter strike at the International Paper Co.'
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
The government today proposed nearly $1.6 million in fines against the owner of a Maine paper mill where inspectors allegedly found 531 violations of safety and health regulations. The action by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration comes six months after an inspection of the Boise Cascade plant in Rumford, Me., a review made at the request of the United Paperworkers International Union. Alan C.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1998 | George White
Mattel Inc. stockholders rejected a resolution that sought to link executive pay with fair labor practices at production sites. The Nashville-based United Paperworkers International union, a Mattel shareholder, submitted the proposal urging the El Segundo-based toy maker to reward executives for enforcing company standards requiring the company and its suppliers to comply with wage laws, workplace-safety requirements and child-labor prohibitions.
NEWS
June 30, 1988
A strike by thousands of workers against northwest timber companies spread to California, but members of one union, threatened with replacement, returned to work in Bend, Ore. Members of the International Woodworkers of America widened their strike against Simpson Timber Co. to plants in Tacoma, Wash., and Arcata and Korbell, Calif., union officials said. The new walkouts, involving 700 workers, brought to 8,000 the number of lumber mill employees refusing to work in five Western states.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1998
* The Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union voted to join forces with the United Paperworkers International Union, reflecting the consolidation in their industries. The merger has been approved by the UPIW board and is expected to be passed by the membership of both unions in January. The new group, which would represent 330,000 members, will be known as PACE (Paper, Allied Industrial, Chemical and Energy Workers International Union). * * Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge Rules in Favor of United Paperworkers: A National Labor Relations Board judge has ordered International Paper Co. to pay as much as $40 million in lost wages to 1,200 union members who were locked out of the company's Mobile, Ala., mill in 1987. Officials of the United Paperworkers International Union said the decision was the largest award ever granted the union. The dispute stemmed from an IP decision to lock employees out of its Mobile mill during a contract disagreement in March, 1987.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
Here on the banks of the Androscoggin River, in the dense woods of western Maine, David battled Goliath and lost. The fight was for more than jobs. It was for the soul of an old mill town and for the right of a hired hand to set a value on his own labor. The battle ended quietly and unexpectedly the other day with no concessions and no consensus. But if there is one point on which everyone agrees, it is that the long, bitter strike at the International Paper Co.'
BUSINESS
August 29, 1986 | Associated Press
More than 55 years ago, this community adopted the name of the company whose asbestos products gave it life, and as it turns out, disease and death. Today, Manville Corp.'s 74-year-old flagship factory is slated to close its doors for economic reasons, leaving behind memories of steady employment but also unanswered questions about obligations of employers that manufacture hazardous products. For 50 years after what was then the Johns-Manville Corp. opened the plant in 1912, the town thrived.
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