Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Parent Services
IN THE NEWS

United Parent Services

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, STAFF WRITER
Anti-gang and youth-intervention programs have been in the spotlight recently, due in part to Hope in Youth's unsuccessful battle to receive funding this year from Los Angeles County. Still, many smaller groups also dedicated to battling the scourge of gang violence in the county, point out that Hope in Youth collected about $7 million in public funds last year, including $3 million from the county. Hope in Youth's gain, these organizations claim, has been their loss.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, STAFF WRITER
Anti-gang and youth-intervention programs have been in the spotlight recently, due in part to Hope in Youth's unsuccessful battle to receive funding this year from Los Angeles County. Still, many smaller groups also dedicated to battling the scourge of gang violence in the county, point out that Hope in Youth collected about $7 million in public funds last year, including $3 million from the county. Hope in Youth's gain, these organizations claim, has been their loss.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1993 | EMILY VIGLIELMO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Compared with many other Los Angeles County areas, the Antelope Valley has little gang activity and Miguel Rios intends to keep it that way. Rios, 33, grew up as a gang member in South-Central Los Angeles on West 42nd Street between Vermont Avenue and Menlo Street, one of four children in a family that included three boys and a girl. While high on PCP, or "angel dust," one brother shot the other brother to death in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1994 | ED BOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Running rapid-fire through the facts and philosophy of his life, Miguel Rios talks about his days as a gang leader in South-Central Los Angeles, his two dead brothers, the times he's been shot and how he draws on these experiences to reach teen-agers today. "You have to be real with these kids," said Rios, 35, head of United Parent Services of America, a small all-volunteer group he began three years ago in his Palmdale home.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|