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United Peasants Party Poland

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NEWS
August 17, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The Polish Communist Party's two longtime parliamentary allies bolted their old coalition Wednesday and agreed to back a Solidarity-led government with Lech Walesa as premier. Solidarity lawmakers, with their new partners in the United Peasants' Party and Democratic Party looking on, endorsed a resolution Wednesday night calling for Walesa to be named premier at the head of what would be the first non-Communist government in the East Bloc.
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NEWS
September 12, 1989
The leader of Poland's United Peasants' Party resigned in a dispute over who will head the Agriculture Ministry in the new, Solidarity-dominated government. Roman Malinowski quit when Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki insisted in nominating Czeslaw Janicki, a Peasants' Party member party leaders do not support. Malinowski, 54, has been under growing criticism in the party for failing to adapt to liberalization in Poland. He was replaced by Dominik Ludwiczak, a party vice chairman.
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NEWS
August 10, 1989
Two parties long allied with Poland's ruling Communists asked for talks with Solidarity leader Lech Walesa on his proposal to form a non-Communist government. Walesa is said to be ready to hold such talks over the next two weeks. The Democratic Party and the United Peasants' Party indicated it is too early to take a final stand on the proposal that Walesa made on Monday, five days after Parliament elected Communist Czeslaw Kiszczak as premier.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Polish President Wojciech Jaruzelski on Thursday accepted Lech Walesa's proposal for a Solidarity-led government, paving the way for the first opposition government in the Soviet Bloc. The historic step, if carried to its conclusion, could end a 45-year-old Communist monopoly on power in Poland.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Expressing concern over "the deepening instability of Poland's political and economic situation," President Wojciech Jaruzelski called Tuesday for an urgent meeting of the country's key political forces to resolve a mounting crisis over the choice of a new government.
NEWS
September 12, 1989
The leader of Poland's United Peasants' Party resigned in a dispute over who will head the Agriculture Ministry in the new, Solidarity-dominated government. Roman Malinowski quit when Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki insisted in nominating Czeslaw Janicki, a Peasants' Party member party leaders do not support. Malinowski, 54, has been under growing criticism in the party for failing to adapt to liberalization in Poland. He was replaced by Dominik Ludwiczak, a party vice chairman.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Premier Czeslaw Kiszczak of Poland, stalled in his efforts to put together a government, called Monday on President Wojciech Jaruzelski to appoint the head of the small United Peasants' Party in his place. Kiszczak appeared to stop short of submitting a formal resignation. He blamed Solidarity leader Lech Walesa for complicating and prolonging his effort to form a Cabinet.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of Solidarity and the United Peasants' Party, the Communists' most important partner, met Thursday to explore the possibility of a Peasants-Solidarity alliance that could threaten the Communists' ability to form a government.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The nomination of Gen. Czeslaw Kiszczak for premier ran into serious trouble in the Polish National Assembly on Tuesday as the Communist Party's key coalition partners rebelled, expressing no support for him.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Polish President Wojciech Jaruzelski on Thursday accepted Lech Walesa's proposal for a Solidarity-led government, paving the way for the first opposition government in the Soviet Bloc. The historic step, if carried to its conclusion, could end a 45-year-old Communist monopoly on power in Poland.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The Polish Communist Party's two longtime parliamentary allies bolted their old coalition Wednesday and agreed to back a Solidarity-led government with Lech Walesa as premier. Solidarity lawmakers, with their new partners in the United Peasants' Party and Democratic Party looking on, endorsed a resolution Wednesday night calling for Walesa to be named premier at the head of what would be the first non-Communist government in the East Bloc.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Expressing concern over "the deepening instability of Poland's political and economic situation," President Wojciech Jaruzelski called Tuesday for an urgent meeting of the country's key political forces to resolve a mounting crisis over the choice of a new government.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Premier Czeslaw Kiszczak of Poland, stalled in his efforts to put together a government, called Monday on President Wojciech Jaruzelski to appoint the head of the small United Peasants' Party in his place. Kiszczak appeared to stop short of submitting a formal resignation. He blamed Solidarity leader Lech Walesa for complicating and prolonging his effort to form a Cabinet.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of Solidarity and the United Peasants' Party, the Communists' most important partner, met Thursday to explore the possibility of a Peasants-Solidarity alliance that could threaten the Communists' ability to form a government.
NEWS
August 10, 1989
Two parties long allied with Poland's ruling Communists asked for talks with Solidarity leader Lech Walesa on his proposal to form a non-Communist government. Walesa is said to be ready to hold such talks over the next two weeks. The Democratic Party and the United Peasants' Party indicated it is too early to take a final stand on the proposal that Walesa made on Monday, five days after Parliament elected Communist Czeslaw Kiszczak as premier.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The nomination of Gen. Czeslaw Kiszczak for premier ran into serious trouble in the Polish National Assembly on Tuesday as the Communist Party's key coalition partners rebelled, expressing no support for him.
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