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NEWS
December 31, 1990 | From Reuters
Rebels in Somalia said today they control most of the capital of Mogadishu and President Mohamed Siad Barre was at the airport preparing to flee the country. "I think he will be gone in the next 24 hours," said a spokesman for the United Somali Congress, one of the main rebel groups fighting to overthrow Maj. Gen. Siad Barre, who has been in power since 1969. "We now control 99% of Mogadishu," the congress spokesman, contacted in Rome by telephone from Nairobi, told Reuters.
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NEWS
December 14, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a single flip of a generator switch on Sunday, Somali technicians at the weather-beaten and bullet-pocked Afgoi Wellfields did something extraordinary. They turned on the water supply for the first time in months to gutted, war-torn Mogadishu, Somalia's capital and home to more than a million desperate, hungry Somalis. But that wasn't the story. That simple act merely climaxed a saga as bizarre as it is sublime in its narrative of today's Somalia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
While the world's attention has focused on how to drive Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait, the Somali people of the Horn of Africa have focused on how to drive dictator Mohamed Siad Barre out of Somalia. Since Dec. 30, when the rebels of the United Somali Congress began to wage a conventional war against the government of Siad Barre, some 2,000 Somalis are reported to have died while the rest of Mogadishu's (the capital city of Somalia) residents (2 million) have become refugees without a refuge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
While the world's attention has focused on how to drive Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait, the Somali people of the Horn of Africa have focused on how to drive dictator Mohamed Siad Barre out of Somalia. Since Dec. 30, when the rebels of the United Somali Congress began to wage a conventional war against the government of Siad Barre, some 2,000 Somalis are reported to have died while the rest of Mogadishu's (the capital city of Somalia) residents (2 million) have become refugees without a refuge.
NEWS
December 14, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a single flip of a generator switch on Sunday, Somali technicians at the weather-beaten and bullet-pocked Afgoi Wellfields did something extraordinary. They turned on the water supply for the first time in months to gutted, war-torn Mogadishu, Somalia's capital and home to more than a million desperate, hungry Somalis. But that wasn't the story. That simple act merely climaxed a saga as bizarre as it is sublime in its narrative of today's Somalia.
NEWS
January 20, 1992 | Associated Press
The Red Cross on Sunday anchored relief ships north and south of Somalia's war-shattered capital and began distributing emergency food to people displaced by fighting. Gregoire Tavernier, a spokesman with the International Committee of the Red Cross in Nairobi, said small dhows were transporting the relief supplies from the ships anchored offshore. Hundreds of thousands of people have fled the capital of Mogadishu since intense clan-based warfare erupted Nov.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
At least three rival Somali rebel groups that helped oust former President Mohammed Siad Barre from power last month plan a conference in the capital city Thursday--if war doesn't break out among them first. Siad Barre escaped when rebels of the United Somali Congress overran the city.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first four military observers in a planned 50-person U.N. team arrived to monitor the cease-fire in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu. Interim President Ali Mahdi Mohamed and his rival, Gen. Mohamed Farrah Aidid, chairman of the United Somali Congress, agreed to the U.N.-sponsored cease-fire on March 3 after a five-month battle for control of the city. Aid officials estimate that 4.5 million Somalians could starve because of drought and the violence that prevented food imports.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, who humiliated U.S. forces in Mogadishu, has been ousted as chairman of his faction by his former right-hand man, who wants the United Nations and aid agencies to return to help rebuild the nation, faction members said Monday. A vote against the 60-year-old Aidid was taken Sunday at a congress in Mogadishu of the United Somali Congress-Somali National Alliance called by his opponents within the group.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Somali rebels battling to oust President Mohamed Siad Barre said today they controlled nearly all the capital of Mogadishu and appealed to his forces to surrender. "We hope that by tonight the city will be completely liberated," a spokesman for the rebel United Somali Congress said in Rome. Chaotic conditions were reported in Mogadishu, where Siad Barre's government has been under rebel siege for a week. Siad Barre's family fled to the United Arab Emirates, according to diplomatic sources.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | From Reuters
Rebels in Somalia said today they control most of the capital of Mogadishu and President Mohamed Siad Barre was at the airport preparing to flee the country. "I think he will be gone in the next 24 hours," said a spokesman for the United Somali Congress, one of the main rebel groups fighting to overthrow Maj. Gen. Siad Barre, who has been in power since 1969. "We now control 99% of Mogadishu," the congress spokesman, contacted in Rome by telephone from Nairobi, told Reuters.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Rebels in control of Mogadishu, the Somali capital, today broadcast a call for a multi-party democracy and the formation of an interim opposition government after the ouster of President Mohamed Siad Barre. The radio broadcast, monitored in Nairobi, said the rebels of the United Somali Congress are committed to founding a new Somali republic based on the ideals of "justice, equality, unity and democracy."
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Reuters
Forces loyal to Somali President Mohamed Siad Barre were locked in fierce battle with rebels in the East African country Tuesday with no clear sign of who was gaining the upper hand. United Nations staff evacuated from Somalia's embattled capital, Mogadishu, to Nairobi said chaos and anarchy reigned as Siad Barre fought to preserve his 21-year rule.
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