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NEWS
October 1, 1996 | From Associated Press
In the biggest change in the history of the space shuttle program, NASA is turning over day-to-day operations to private industry beginning today to save money. "Today is the first day of a new space program in America," NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin said Monday in announcing the $7-billion, six-year contract with United Space Alliance, a joint venture of Rockwell International Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp.
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NATIONAL
January 17, 2010 | By Robert Block
The people who work on the space shuttle don't fly on the orbiters they maintain -- but it appears at least one of them may have been getting high. A shuttle worker employed by United Space Alliance found a plastic bag with a white powder residue -- later confirmed to be cocaine -- in a shuttle processing hangar at Kennedy Space Center last week. The worker gave it to NASA security, and about 200 workers were given drug tests. There was no indication that any of the workers were impaired, NASA said.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL
It plays out a little bit like the classic "Who's on First?" routine by comedians Bud Abbott and Lou Costello., but here goes: Rockwell International Inc. and Lockheed Martin Corp. used to be joint partners in an operation called the United Space Alliance, which has the contract to operate the space shuttle program for NASA. But Rockwell sold its aerospace and defense operations to Boeing Co., which formed them into a new business unit called Boeing North American Inc.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL
It plays out a little bit like the classic "Who's on First?" routine by comedians Bud Abbott and Lou Costello., but here goes: Rockwell International Inc. and Lockheed Martin Corp. used to be joint partners in an operation called the United Space Alliance, which has the contract to operate the space shuttle program for NASA. But Rockwell sold its aerospace and defense operations to Boeing Co., which formed them into a new business unit called Boeing North American Inc.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rockwell, Lockheed to Manage Space Shuttle: United Space Alliance, a joint venture of Rockwell International Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp., will negotiate a non-competitive contract to manage the program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said. The selection was expected because the companies already handle much of the shuttle's maintenance and modification. Seal Beach-based Rockwell built the shuttle orbiters.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA Agrees to Turn Over Shuttle Management: The space agency said it signed a $7-billion deal to place the day-to-day running of the shuttle program in private hands. The United Space Alliance, a Houston-based joint venture of Rockwell International Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp., signed the contract with NASA on Thursday.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL
United Space Alliance, a joint venture of Seal Beach-based Rockwell International Corp. and Maryland's Lockheed Martin Inc., officially replaces NASA today as operator of the nation's space shuttle program. The final Space Flight Operations contract approving the joint venture was signed Monday in Houston. The initial six-year pact is valued at $6.3 billion, and there are options for a pair of two-year extensions that would bring the total to $12 billion for 10 years.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2010 | By Robert Block
The people who work on the space shuttle don't fly on the orbiters they maintain -- but it appears at least one of them may have been getting high. A shuttle worker employed by United Space Alliance found a plastic bag with a white powder residue -- later confirmed to be cocaine -- in a shuttle processing hangar at Kennedy Space Center last week. The worker gave it to NASA security, and about 200 workers were given drug tests. There was no indication that any of the workers were impaired, NASA said.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The last time Steven Hawley saw the Hubble Space Telescope, he'd just dropped it off in orbit--a poignant end, he figured, to his space-flying career. Nearly seven years later, Hawley is coming out of astronaut retirement to revisit the world's most famous telescope. It's more than the call of Hubble. Hawley wants to persuade naysayers that the space shuttle is safe to fly now that private industry is calling more and more of the shots with fewer and fewer people.
NATIONAL
June 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A union representing 570 space shuttle program workers at the Kennedy Space Center voted to strike less than a week before the planned launch of the shuttle Atlantis. The International Assn. of Machinist and Aerospace Workers, which represents the United Space Alliance employees, rejected the company's contract offer, Florida Today reported. United Space Alliance spokeswoman Tracy Yates said the union might strike as early as June 10, two days after NASA plans to launch Atlantis.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The last time Steven Hawley saw the Hubble Space Telescope, he'd just dropped it off in orbit--a poignant end, he figured, to his space-flying career. Nearly seven years later, Hawley is coming out of astronaut retirement to revisit the world's most famous telescope. It's more than the call of Hubble. Hawley wants to persuade naysayers that the space shuttle is safe to fly now that private industry is calling more and more of the shots with fewer and fewer people.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL
United Space Alliance, a joint venture of Seal Beach-based Rockwell International Corp. and Maryland's Lockheed Martin Inc., officially replaces NASA today as operator of the nation's space shuttle program. The final Space Flight Operations contract approving the joint venture was signed Monday in Houston. The initial six-year pact is valued at $6.3 billion, and there are options for a pair of two-year extensions that would bring the total to $12 billion for 10 years.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA Agrees to Turn Over Shuttle Management: The space agency said it signed a $7-billion deal to place the day-to-day running of the shuttle program in private hands. The United Space Alliance, a Houston-based joint venture of Rockwell International Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp., signed the contract with NASA on Thursday.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | From Associated Press
In the biggest change in the history of the space shuttle program, NASA is turning over day-to-day operations to private industry beginning today to save money. "Today is the first day of a new space program in America," NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin said Monday in announcing the $7-billion, six-year contract with United Space Alliance, a joint venture of Rockwell International Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rockwell, Lockheed to Manage Space Shuttle: United Space Alliance, a joint venture of Rockwell International Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp., will negotiate a non-competitive contract to manage the program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said. The selection was expected because the companies already handle much of the shuttle's maintenance and modification. Seal Beach-based Rockwell built the shuttle orbiters.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston failed to keep adequate watch on safety operations of a major contractor responsible for space shuttle operations, an internal NASA audit says. The audit, completed in March but not released until Friday, reported problems in the supervision of United Space Alliance's safety procedures. The space center is responsible for that oversight. United Space Alliance, a joint venture of Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2000
Three aerospace companies being sued by the Justice Department for allegedly concealing millions of dollars in fraudulent billings by a NASA subcontractor have denied any legal responsibility. Rockwell International spokesman Terry Francisco said Thursday that the company divested itself of any liability when it sold its aerospace business to Boeing in 1996.
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