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United State Borders Mexico

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NEWS
July 7, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN and CRAIG PYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the second time in a week, an unlikely group huddled in a conference room at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration headquarters here--not far from what has become one of the most porous spots on the U.S. border. They were from the United States and Mexico. Some were former policemen, others lifelong cattle ranchers. But most were now cowboys with a deep mistrust of government, residents of what they call "The Free State of Maverick County."
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NEWS
July 7, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN and CRAIG PYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the second time in a week, an unlikely group huddled in a conference room at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration headquarters here--not far from what has become one of the most porous spots on the U.S. border. They were from the United States and Mexico. Some were former policemen, others lifelong cattle ranchers. But most were now cowboys with a deep mistrust of government, residents of what they call "The Free State of Maverick County."
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BOOKS
March 15, 1987 | Frank del Olmo, Del Olmo is a Times editorial writer, specializing in Latin American affairs.
The publishers of "La Frontera" apparently could not decide if they wanted the book to be a serious and thorough study of the U.S.-Mexico border, or a coffeetable book about the often picturesque borderlands and colorful North Americans and Mexicans who live there. That is unfortunate, because in either case, the book would have been a useful contribution to the growing body of literature about the nation's southern border. Instead, it falls short on both counts.
BOOKS
March 15, 1987 | Frank del Olmo, Del Olmo is a Times editorial writer, specializing in Latin American affairs.
The publishers of "La Frontera" apparently could not decide if they wanted the book to be a serious and thorough study of the U.S.-Mexico border, or a coffeetable book about the often picturesque borderlands and colorful North Americans and Mexicans who live there. That is unfortunate, because in either case, the book would have been a useful contribution to the growing body of literature about the nation's southern border. Instead, it falls short on both counts.
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