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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cash may have gone out of style as the currency of choice, but can the government confiscate your money simply because you are carrying too much of it? For the 41-year-old owner of two Hollywood service stations, the answer so far has been "yes." On June 9, 1994, Hosep Bajakajian and his wife went to Los Angeles International Airport to board a flight to his native Syria. In their suitcases and carry-on bags, they had packed $357,144 in cash, which he said was intended to pay off family debts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cash may have gone out of style as the currency of choice, but can the government confiscate your money simply because you are carrying too much of it? For the 41-year-old owner of two Hollywood service stations, the answer so far has been "yes." On June 9, 1994, Hosep Bajakajian and his wife went to Los Angeles International Airport to board a flight to his native Syria. In their suitcases and carry-on bags, they had packed $357,144 in cash, which he said was intended to pay off family debts.
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NEWS
October 12, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after the government apologized to Cold War-era workers made sick by their jobs in the nuclear weapons industry, Congress is poised to follow through with legislation to give financial compensation to victims. The House on Wednesday overwhelmingly approved a defense bill that contains a provision granting thousands of eligible workers or their heirs $150,000 each. Surviving workers would also be eligible for government-paid health care for life.
OPINION
February 19, 2006 | David Lesher and Mark Baldassare, David Lesher is the California program director of the New America Foundation. Mark Baldassare is research director at the Public Policy Institute of California and conducts its statewide surveys.
CALIFORNIA VOTERS are shedding their identification with the two major political parties so rapidly that if current trends continue, independent voters could outnumber Democrats and Republicans in the Golden State by 2025. These new independents, who eschew ideological loyalty and rigid partisan labels, represent a significant challenge to the mainstream parties.
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