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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A whopping 41% of people who are transgender or gender-nonconforming have attempted suicide sometime in their lives, nearly nine times the national average, according to a sweeping survey released three years ago. In a new study released Tuesday, researchers dug deeper into that number, analyzing the results of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey to examine what puts transgender people at such "exceptionally high" risk. Researchers from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law found that the risk of attempting suicide was especially severe for transgender or gender nonconforming people who had suffered discrimination or violence, such as being physically or sexually assaulted at work or school.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun, Maura Dolan and Kurt Streeter
As the Clippers struggled through a playoff loss in Oakland, the pressure on team owner Donald Sterling mounted Sunday with the release of additional minutes of a racially charged recording and a flurry of denunciations from President Obama, NBA players, fans and even the NAACP that had sought to honor him. The comments about blacks that were attributed to Sterling show "the United States continues to wrestle with the legacy of race and slavery and...
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SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
As a boy, Patrick Manyika looked up and watched packages of corn and canned fish fall from the sky. An airplane streamed overhead, dropping supplies to the hundreds of refugees living in isolation in the rolling hills and forests of northeast Rwanda. The relief packages read "USAID" - it was the first word he would learn to read. Manyika lived as a child in exile on the land of a national park, survived the Rwandan genocide as a teenager and eventually made his way to a private university in Southern California.
WORLD
July 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. House passed a nonbinding resolution urging Japan to apologize for coercing thousands of women into working as sex slaves for its World War II military. Officials in Tokyo say their country's leaders have apologized repeatedly, but the resolution's supporters say Japan has never fully assumed responsibility. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe caused anger in March when he said there was no evidence that the women had been coerced. Lawmakers want an apology similar to the one the U.S.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Saudi Arabia remains the world's leading source of money for Al Qaeda and other extremist networks and has failed to take key steps requested by U.S. officials to stem the flow, the Bush administration's top financial counter-terrorism official said Tuesday. Stuart A.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
There are more millionaires in the United States than ever before. The number of households with net worth of $1 million or more, excluding their homes, is at a record 9.63 million, according to a new report. That eclipses the old mark of 9.2 million in 2007 before the global financial crisis, according to the Spectrem Group research firm. The tally of millionaires slipped to 6.7 million in 2008 as the financial crisis struck. The study reinforces other data showing that the wealthy are doing well compared to many other segments of society.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2005 | James Flanigan
The Fourth of July weekend seems like a good time to examine some of the heat and rhetoric lately surrounding one of the basic building blocks of our society: immigration. There is widespread concern that too many immigrants are coming in and, worse, that waves of unskilled workers will form a permanent underclass and change the historic dynamic of American society. These are serious matters. Immigration is part of the DNA of America, and it's as necessary today as ever.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Meg James, Chmielewski and James are Times staff writers.
Worried by the worsening economy, Kristen Olson decided she'd better start saving money. She tallied her expenses and was walloped by sticker shock: She and her roommates were spending $900 a year for cable TV. "I'm not watching $900 worth of cable," said the 25-year-old advertising account coordinator, who lives in North Hollywood. She's trying to persuade her roommates to drop the service.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By Leon Aron
At the moment, our preoccupation is President Vladimir Putin's next move outside Russia. Will he invade eastern Ukraine? Will he move into Moldova? But even more worrisome than these territorial issues is what Putin may have in mind for Russia itself. The Russian president did not engineer the Ukrainian crisis, but he has exploited it to begin forging something far more dangerous than land grabs: namely, a political arrangement that could secure his rule of Russia for life. The annexation of Crimea has fueled nationalist hysteria and paranoia within Russia, and Putin has ridden that wave, reshaping his government into one that is far more repressive, ideologically driven, openly messianic and founded on a revisionist view of history that is explicitly anti-West and anti-American.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - As President Obama warned of possible new U.S. sanctions against Russia, a senior Ukrainian official Thursday urged the West to move immediately to impose penalties against entire sectors of the Russian economy. Danylo Lubkivsky, Ukraine's deputy foreign minister, said the United States and Europe need to move beyond sanctions on individuals to the more far-reaching “sectoral” sanctions because Russia “has already crossed the red line.” With Russia sending more troops to its region bordering Ukraine, “we have to do it right now,” he said in an appearance at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Even as the United States continues its historic move toward fairness and equity for gay people, antiquated anti-sodomy laws remain on the books in a dozen states. Theoretically, these laws were rendered unenforceable by the Supreme Court's 2003 ruling in Lawrence vs. Texas, but apparently not everyone has received that message. In the Lawrence case, the court declared that state laws banning consensual same-sex relations were unconstitutional. Yet somehow, between 2011 and 2014, 12 men were arrested in East Baton Rouge Parish in Louisiana under the state's remaining anti-sodomy laws.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Yuriko Nagano and Julie Makinen
TOKYO -- Hiroshi Kyoso says he values Japan's relationship with the United States highly and feels warmly about Washington's new ambassador to Tokyo, Caroline Kennedy. But as the 90-year-old veteran of World War II arrived Wednesday morning to pray at Tokyo's Yasukuni shrine -- a controversial site that commemorates nearly 2.5 million of Japan's war dead including 14 top war criminals -- Kyoso said he saw no connection between the shrine and Japan's ties with America. If a Japanese leader visits Yasukuni, he said, it's only natural.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | Tina Susman and Alana Semuels
The cheers were louder, the runners more determined, the tears of joy and relief at the Boston Marathon finish line Monday more heartfelt than ever. And yes, the security was tighter. But on a brilliant spring day, the city brought to grief by terrorist bombings one year earlier sprinted back in the resolute style of the runners who tore through quiet suburbs and charming town squares to the finish line, where the roars grew deafening as Meb Keflezighi became the first American man to win the marathon since 1983.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The fragile diplomatic accord to resolve the Ukraine crisis frayed Sunday as an armed clash erupted in eastern Ukraine and top Russian and Ukrainian officials, appearing on television talk shows, each demanded the other side lay down its weapons. Russia's ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak, said a gunfight early Easter morning that left at least three people dead at a checkpoint outside the eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk showed the need for all sides to disarm.
OPINION
April 20, 2014 | By Andrew J. Bacevich
The government of Iraq last week announced that it had padlocked the infamous prison at Abu Ghraib. The gates are closed. The inmates moved. Whether the closure is permanent or temporary -- Iraqi officials suggest the latter -- this ought to qualify as a notable milestone. What does it signify? Sometimes a prison is just a building, its closure of no more significance than the demolition of a market or the shuttering of a strip mall. Yet from time to time, the closing of a facility constructed for the purpose of confining humans invites reflection.
SPORTS
September 23, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
When the Solheim Cup, a team competition that pits women golfers from the United States against Europe, returns to the United States in 2017, it will be at the Des Moines Golf and Country Club, which hosted the 1999 U.S. Senior Open Championship. The U.S. lost the Cup to Europe last month in Colorado. The top-ranked U.S. golfer, Stacy Lewis, said, "Playing in the Solheim Cup is one of the greatest experiences that you can have as a golfer. The atmosphere and excitement that's created by the fans is unlike any other event in golf and I can't wait to see the amazing display put on by the great fans in Des Moines.” The 2015 Solheim Cup will take place at Golf Course St. Leon-Rot in Germany.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2000
The United States is enriched by its multiplicity. From the volcanoes of Hawaii to the glaciers of Alaska, the United States encompasses a great variety of landforms, wildlife and natural resources and has always boasted a diversity of cultures. In 1776, the United States was just one vote away from having German made its official language and continues to benefit from the arrival of people from all nations.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Prince Bandar bin Sultan's replacement last week as Saudi Arabia's intelligence chief has fueled speculation about a shift in the monarchy's shaky relations with the United States and its position toward the Syrian conflict - not to mention about the prince's political future. Yet many political experts and pundits believe Bandar's departure will barely affect Saudi foreign policies. And they say it's possible the prince could return to the political scene stronger than ever. “The last person to be relieved of his duties [in 2012]
NATIONAL
April 19, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Daniel Swalm was researching his family when he came across a disturbing episode in immigration history. That discovery would lead to a move in the U.S. Senate to apologize for action the nation took more than a century ago. Swalm discovered that under an obscure 1907 law, his grandmother Elsie, born and raised in Minnesota, was stripped of her U.S. citizenship after marrying an immigrant from Sweden. Swalm had never heard of the Expatriation Act that required a U.S.-born woman who married a foreigner to "take the nationality of her husband.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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