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October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Zeituni Onyango, an aunt of President Obama whose bid for asylum in the United States received national attention during her nephew's first campaign for the presidency and contributed to the debate over illegal immigration, died Tuesday in Boston. She was 61. Onyango had been treated in recent months for cancer and respiratory problems, said Cleveland attorney Margaret Wong, who represented Onyango in her immigration case. A half sister of Obama's late father, Onyango moved from Kenya to the U.S. in 2000.
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WORLD
July 31, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. House passed a nonbinding resolution urging Japan to apologize for coercing thousands of women into working as sex slaves for its World War II military. Officials in Tokyo say their country's leaders have apologized repeatedly, but the resolution's supporters say Japan has never fully assumed responsibility. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe caused anger in March when he said there was no evidence that the women had been coerced. Lawmakers want an apology similar to the one the U.S.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama used his executive power and a hot-button issue to try to stoke support from a key election-year constituency Tuesday, as he issued two directives aimed at ensuring federal contractors pay women as much as men for equal work. Surrounding himself with female supporters at the White House, Obama signed an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about how much money they make. Advocates say secrecy about salaries is a major contributor to the gap in average pay between male and female workers in the United States, which the White House says means women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. The president also ordered contractors to report data to the government showing the compensation paid to employees by gender and race.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
There are more millionaires in the United States than ever before. The number of households with net worth of $1 million or more, excluding their homes, is at a record 9.63 million, according to a new report. That eclipses the old mark of 9.2 million in 2007 before the global financial crisis, according to the Spectrem Group research firm. The tally of millionaires slipped to 6.7 million in 2008 as the financial crisis struck. The study reinforces other data showing that the wealthy are doing well compared to many other segments of society.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Saudi Arabia remains the world's leading source of money for Al Qaeda and other extremist networks and has failed to take key steps requested by U.S. officials to stem the flow, the Bush administration's top financial counter-terrorism official said Tuesday. Stuart A.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2005 | James Flanigan
The Fourth of July weekend seems like a good time to examine some of the heat and rhetoric lately surrounding one of the basic building blocks of our society: immigration. There is widespread concern that too many immigrants are coming in and, worse, that waves of unskilled workers will form a permanent underclass and change the historic dynamic of American society. These are serious matters. Immigration is part of the DNA of America, and it's as necessary today as ever.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Meg James, Chmielewski and James are Times staff writers.
Worried by the worsening economy, Kristen Olson decided she'd better start saving money. She tallied her expenses and was walloped by sticker shock: She and her roommates were spending $900 a year for cable TV. "I'm not watching $900 worth of cable," said the 25-year-old advertising account coordinator, who lives in North Hollywood. She's trying to persuade her roommates to drop the service.
SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
California's population grew by roughly 332,000 people in the last fiscal year - its biggest increase in nearly a decade, according to new California Department of Finance estimates. "It's a sign that our economy is recovering," said Hans Johnson, a Public Policy Institute of California demographer. "But it's still pretty slow growth. " The estimated population rose 0.88%, exceeding 38.2 million as of July. Most of that growth was "natural increase" - births minus deaths. But those numbers stayed roughly the same as in recent years, while immigration has increased.
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "Tarnished political brands," Opinion, April 2 I am tired of hearing about the Bushes and the Clintons as comparable political dynasties. We've had one Clinton elected to the White House, and his wife served as a senator and then secretary of State in the Obama administration. There is no comparison to the actual Bush dynasty. George H.W. Bush was head of the CIA, vice president and eventually president. His eldest son was governor of Texas and then president; another son was governor of Florida.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Peter Matthiessen, a rich man's son who rejected a life of ease in favor of physical and spiritual challenges and produced such acclaimed works as "The Snow Leopard" and "At Play in the Fields of the Lord," died Saturday. He was 86. His publisher Geoff Kloske of Riverhead Books said Matthiessen, who had been diagnosed with leukemia, was ill "for some months. " He died at a hospital near his home on Long Island in New York. Matthiessen helped found the Paris Review, one of the most influential literary magazines, and won National Book Awards for "The Snow Leopard," his spiritual account of the Himalayas, and for "Shadow Country.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Don Lee
TAIPEI, Taiwan - For decades, relations between Taiwan and its giant neighbor China have been one of the great success stories of the ending of the Cold War. Slowly but surely, the two nations have pulled back from half a century of bellicose confrontation and in recent years embraced a level of political and economic cooperation that seemed to promise new riches for both. But today, for many Taiwanese, the bloom is off the rose. This disenchantment lay behind the outbreak of angry protests from Taiwanese students that are in their third week.
WORLD
April 3, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - The last time Abdullah Abdullah ran for president of Afghanistan the election devolved into a bloody farce. Votes cast in some areas in 2009 exceeded the number of voters. One in 5 ballots nationwide was tossed out because of fraud. Thirty-one people died in insurgent attacks. Days before a runoff against President Hamid Karzai, Abdullah withdrew from the race, fearing more fraud in the incumbent's favor. Five years later, the Karzai era is ending, as is the dominant role of the United States in Afghan life.
OPINION
April 1, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
There's a new tone in the latest report on climate change from the United Nations' expert organization on the subject. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change doesn't just forecast the usual sweeping changes that are likely to occur as the planet warms, the kinds of warnings the public has heard (and often ignored) for decades. The report released Sunday goes further by pointing out alarming signs of what is happening already. In a rational world, it would be more than enough to propel world leaders into action.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Russian troops are massing menacingly on Ukraine's eastern border. The civil war in Syria is still raging, and 33,000 American troops fight on in Afghanistan. So where is Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel headed this week? To Hawaii - for a meeting with defense ministers from Asia, the region the Obama administration still considers its top foreign policy priority. "Asia is one of the great success stories of the world," Hagel told me in an interview in his Pentagon office last week.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Russian troops are massing menacingly on Ukraine's eastern border. The civil war in Syria is still raging, and 33,000 American troops fight on in Afghanistan. So where is Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel headed this week? To Hawaii - for a meeting with defense ministers from Asia, the region the Obama administration still considers its top foreign policy priority. "Asia is one of the great success stories of the world," Hagel told me in an interview in his Pentagon office last week.
SPORTS
September 23, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
When the Solheim Cup, a team competition that pits women golfers from the United States against Europe, returns to the United States in 2017, it will be at the Des Moines Golf and Country Club, which hosted the 1999 U.S. Senior Open Championship. The U.S. lost the Cup to Europe last month in Colorado. The top-ranked U.S. golfer, Stacy Lewis, said, "Playing in the Solheim Cup is one of the greatest experiences that you can have as a golfer. The atmosphere and excitement that's created by the fans is unlike any other event in golf and I can't wait to see the amazing display put on by the great fans in Des Moines.” The 2015 Solheim Cup will take place at Golf Course St. Leon-Rot in Germany.
WORLD
March 30, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The top U.S. and Russian diplomats agreed Sunday to work with Ukrainian government officials to ease the crisis triggered by Russia's annexation of Crimea, but remained far apart on other key points after four hours of negotiations in Paris. Secretary of State John F. Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov called the meeting constructive. Lavrov's remarks suggested that Moscow may now be more willing to work with the interim Ukrainian government, which it has previously dismissed as illegitimate.
WORLD
March 30, 2014 | By Glen Johnson
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Turkey's ruling Justice and Development Party appeared headed toward a sizable victory in the country's municipal elections Sunday, despite a corruption scandal that continues to swirl around Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his inner circle. With 85% of the vote counted, the party, known as the AKP, had secured between 44% and 47% of municipal posts, while the main opposition Republican People's Party, or CHP, garnered between 27% and 29%, according to Turkish media reports early Monday.
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