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NEWS
January 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
High-voltage electrical currents zapped onto citrus could kill fruit fly larvae and stop the destructive insects from hitchhiking into the United States, the Agriculture Department said. The electrical method could be used on U.S. citrus imports and may be an effective alternative to spraying methyl bromide, a fumigant that is set to be phased out by 2005 because of concerns that it weakens the earth's ozone layer, the department said.
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BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Sugar growers will be encouraged to destroy some of their crop for a second consecutive year in an effort to prop up prices and reduce a government-held stockpile. Growers who agree to plow under crops will each be given as much as $20,000 worth of sugar that the government has acquired under a price-support program, the Agriculture Department said Friday. The USDA is paying $1.
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BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Their names were Fuji, Judo, Mazda and Ryusho. Before they died of old age years ago, they left behind a genetic legacy worth millions of dollars for cattle breeder Don Lively, one that the Japanese contend is a stolen national treasure. The legacy is semen. The four Japanese bulls that provided it were brought to the United States in a shroud of secrecy 14 years ago. Some people say the semen is a rare commodity that could revolutionize the beef industry in both countries.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration, already at odds with California over electricity costs, is at the center of a fierce lobbying battle over a federal regulation that could add several cents a gallon to gasoline prices in the state. State officials have asked the administration to waive a clean-air regulation that would force refiners to add ethanol to much of the gasoline sold in California.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
They've heard about the commodity trading scandal in the cornfields of the Midwest and they're not amused. "I'm been flooded with calls all day from farmers who don't want more regulation--they want to close the futures markets down," said Sen. Bob Kerry (D-Neb.). Rep. Neal Smith (D-Iowa) has had several calls, too, reminding him that "that there's a whole lot of people who just don't trust these markets."
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
Toxic heavy metals, chemicals and radioactive wastes are being recycled as fertilizer and spread over farmers' fields nationwide--and there is no federal law requiring that they be listed as ingredients, the Seattle Times reported. The issue came to light in the central Washington town of Quincy, population 4,000, when Mayor Patty Martin led an investigation by local farmers concerned about poor yields and sickly cattle.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
The great drought of 1988 is the costliest natural disaster in America's history, with economic losses exceeding those of any previously documented drought, earthquake, hurricane or flood. Farm production alone will be reduced by an estimated $11 billion to $15 billion, the government's Interagency Drought Policy Committee reported Friday. Consumers, rather than farmers, will pay for most of the losses, and the impact will linger well into 1989, the committee and other economists agreed.
NEWS
February 3, 1989
Agriculture Secretary-designate Clayton K. Yeutter, warmly praised by senators at his confirmation hearing, made clear that he will push for a major overhaul of farm subsidy programs. But proposed changes must await the outcome of the Uruguay round of trade talks, the former U.S. trade representative told the Senate Agriculture Committee. Senators lauded Yeutter for helping to increase exports of beef, citrus and processed food to Japan and tobacco to several Asian countries.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Franklin D. Roosevelt and the 73rd Congress enacted legislation in the depths of the Great Depression to deliver the failing American farmer from financial ruin, they did not have Arnold Travis and Eugene Veenhuis in mind.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The United States has begun preparing to fire another big salvo in its trade dispute with the European Community over Europe's move Jan. 1 barring imports of American beef from animals treated with growth-inducing hormones. In a move that could escalate the skirmish substantially, the Agriculture Department has sent a letter to major European governments questioning whether they have been maintaining proper standards in inspecting European meat that is being shipped to the United States.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the federal laboratory that tests for foot-and-mouth disease said Tuesday that travel patterns have increased the possibility of the disease moving from England to the United States. "The chances are greater today than they were three months ago," said David Huxsoll, director of the Department of Agriculture's Plum Island Laboratory here. "There are a lot of people who go to Europe. They go through Britain."
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the European Union both refused to yield Wednesday in a transatlantic food fight over an American ban on imports of European meat because of foot-and-mouth disease, and Europe's refusal to import biologically engineered food from the U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman and David Byrne, the EU's commissioner for health and consumer protection, each promised to look into the competing import bans but ruled out any immediate change.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Voicing confidence that U.S. regulations were strong enough to defend against "mad cow" disease, U.S. farm groups promised not to break the rules by feeding livestock remains to their cattle. The pledge came after representatives from cattle and feed groups met with government officials to discuss whether the United States needs to bolster its defenses against the brain-wasting illness that continues to spread in Europe. The meeting was held as U.S.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
A presidential commission recommended Friday that the Food and Drug Administration regulate tobacco for health reasons and that the government compensate farmers who agree to stop growing the crop. In September, then-President Clinton named tobacco farmers, anti-smoking advocates and economic development experts to the panel, with a goal of aiding the farmers financially while protecting the public from smoking hazards.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of animal feed producers are violating rules intended to keep mad cow disease out of the United States, prompting the government to warn that companies must shape up or expect shutdowns, even prosecution. The food supply remains safe despite the violations because no cases of mad cow disease have been found in U.S. cattle, the Food and Drug Administration said.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Starting today, the government will allow farmers to display a seal on meat and dairy products to attest that they treat their cattle and chickens humanely. But the voluntary standards are so stringent that few farmers initially can meet them. To qualify for the "free farmed" seal, farms would have to eliminate cages for laying hens and stop using forced molting, the withdrawal of food and water to increase egg production. Dairy cattle would have to have access to pastures.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
Drought, already disrupting life in California and the Pacific Northwest, may be taking hold across widespread areas of the United States and southern Canada, raising the possibility of crop failures, forest fires and water rationing. Although it will take at least until midsummer to determine the severity of this year's drought and its impact on the economy, agriculture officials and weather experts are worried about dry conditions in the Southeast, the Midwest and the Great Plains.
NEWS
June 25, 1988 | RHONDA BERGMAN, Times Staff Writer
Grasshoppers are swarming over Gary Broyles' Montana farm, aphids are stealing sap from Bob Wallace's sugar beets in California and spider mites in Illinois have almost finished off Ron Mann's clover and are moving in on his soybeans. What the drought is not killing on the nation's farms, insects seem to be eating. "It is not like the plague or anything like that but locally insects can hurt some and potentially cause lower yields," said Dave Noetzel, a Minnesota entomologist.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2000 | Associated Press
With the nation awash in sugar, the government is preparing to give some of the surplus to farmers who pledge to destroy some of this fall's crop. Officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture said that's the most feasible way to prop up domestic sugar prices at the least cost to taxpayers, although a final decision has not yet been made. Critics derided the idea as a desperate attempt to bail out growers, who are partly to blame for the surplus.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of 112 farmers has filed a lawsuit alleging they have been treated unfairly by the same federal agency that was sued by black farmers claiming decades of racial discrimination in federal lending practices. The black farmers won a $2.2-billion settlement. Lawyer Jimmy Robertson, who filed the latest lawsuit in Jackson, Miss.
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