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United States Agriculture Federal Aid

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September 19, 1999 | From Reuters
Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said Saturday that U.S. farmers will begin receiving emergency farm aid payments quicker than in previous years. He said farmers will receive their payments as soon as the government can verify their claims. Last year, payments to farmers were delayed until all farmers' claims had been verified, he said.
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NEWS
September 19, 1999 | From Reuters
Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said Saturday that U.S. farmers will begin receiving emergency farm aid payments quicker than in previous years. He said farmers will receive their payments as soon as the government can verify their claims. Last year, payments to farmers were delayed until all farmers' claims had been verified, he said.
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NEWS
September 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration offered a $7.1-billion plan to aid farmers, including $2 billion in emergency disaster assistance. Democrats hope to attach the plan to a supplemental spending bill to be debated by Congress. But they face an uphill battle: Republicans have vowed to pass their own $3.9-billion farm package, attaching it to the 1999 agriculture spending bill being worked out by House and Senate negotiators.
NEWS
September 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration offered a $7.1-billion plan to aid farmers, including $2 billion in emergency disaster assistance. Democrats hope to attach the plan to a supplemental spending bill to be debated by Congress. But they face an uphill battle: Republicans have vowed to pass their own $3.9-billion farm package, attaching it to the 1999 agriculture spending bill being worked out by House and Senate negotiators.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | Associated Press
With scorching heat killing people and destroying crops, President Clinton authorized $100 million Thursday to help Americans pay their electric bills and buy air conditioners and fans, and he ordered disaster relief rushed to Texas farmers. Clinton released $100 million from the low-income home energy assistance program to people in 11 Southern and Western states where temperatures are 16% to 26% above normal.
NEWS
February 6, 1996 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as record cold grips the nation's heartland, farmers are busy preparing the paperwork for their spring planting. But with loans to secure, seeds to order and fertilizer to buy, one critical document is missing from the farmers' dossiers: the federal farm bill. The legislation remains unsettled five months after its expected completion date--and the end is not yet in sight.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
Responding to a "dangerous moment" for American farmers, President Clinton on Saturday said the government is buying 2.5 million tons of wheat to push up prices. The wheat will be donated to starving populations in Sudan and elsewhere. "America's farm families face a crisis, and we have an obligation to help," Clinton said in his weekly radio address, which he taped in Little Rock, Ark.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | Associated Press
With scorching heat killing people and destroying crops, President Clinton authorized $100 million Thursday to help Americans pay their electric bills and buy air conditioners and fans, and he ordered disaster relief rushed to Texas farmers. Clinton released $100 million from the low-income home energy assistance program to people in 11 Southern and Western states where temperatures are 16% to 26% above normal.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
Responding to a "dangerous moment" for American farmers, President Clinton on Saturday said the government is buying 2.5 million tons of wheat to push up prices. The wheat will be donated to starving populations in Sudan and elsewhere. "America's farm families face a crisis, and we have an obligation to help," Clinton said in his weekly radio address, which he taped in Little Rock, Ark.
NEWS
February 6, 1996 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as record cold grips the nation's heartland, farmers are busy preparing the paperwork for their spring planting. But with loans to secure, seeds to order and fertilizer to buy, one critical document is missing from the farmers' dossiers: the federal farm bill. The legislation remains unsettled five months after its expected completion date--and the end is not yet in sight.
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