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United States Agriculture

NEWS
January 6, 1999 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture on Tuesday reached an agreement that will pay hundreds of millions of dollars to at least 3,500 black farmers who have complained for more than a decade that federal officials denied them loans that were routinely issued to white farmers. Under terms of the settlement, individual farmers with verifiable complaints will receive tax-free cash payments of at least $50,000, said legal sources.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With demand from Asia sinking, pork is no longer bringing home the bacon for Hoosier farmer Jim Moseley. "The reason we have $28 pigs now," said Moseley, recalling the days of $52 hogs, "is we had built a substantial demand base in Japan and Taiwan. The Asian crisis is hurting us." He has lots of company. The nation's agricultural producers are feeling pinched as a falloff in Asian demand for grains, meats, cotton and produce takes a multibillion-dollar bite out of U.S. farm exports.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | ARTHUR S. BRISBANE, THE WASHINGTON POST
If you've been under the impression after your weekly trip to the grocery store that you've been paying more for milk products, you're right. In fact, government tinkering, exports and the weather are to blame for a nearly 9% increase in consumer prices for dairy products in the past year, dairy experts say. According to government figures, that is more than double the rate that prices in general have gone up in 1989 and half again as much as all food prices.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Senate on Tuesday rejected a Democrat-backed $11-billion bailout of the farm economy in favor of a smaller Republican package. But lawmakers said they hoped to work out a bipartisan compromise later this week. "There's bipartisan recognition that there's a disaster out there," said Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). The Republican-controlled Senate defeated the Democratic plan, 54 to 44, after Democrats, in a 51-47 vote, narrowly failed to kill the $7-billion GOP emergency farm package.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1999 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring concern over the growing use of genetically engineered ingredients in processed foods, the environmental group Greenpeace released a study Thursday that shows three top baby food and nutritional products contain DNA from genetically engineered corn and soybeans. The study of eight popular products taken from grocery shelves earlier this year is part of a larger campaign by environmentalists and consumer groups to persuade lawmakers and the U.S.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Clinton issued an executive order to expand federal efforts to combat the growing problems created by the quiet influx of foreign plants and animals into the U.S. Troublesome alien species, such as the Chinese mitten crab and the voracious Asian long-horned beetle, are costing Americans tens of billions of dollars and threatening entire ecosystems. Three senior administration officials will head a new interagency Invasive Species Council.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House abandoned a major economic weapon against renegade nations Wednesday and said the United States would no longer restrict their purchase of American food, medicine and medical supplies. The announcement marks a major departure in U.S. economic, foreign and farm policy. As a result, Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea and Sudan could eventually gain access to U.S. supplies, which have been largely off limits.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
Tackling the touchy topic of antibiotic use in agriculture, regulators said Tuesday that they want to impose new restrictions to combat concerns that on-the-farm medication is creating drug-resistant germs that could wind up in the food supply. Advisors to the Food and Drug Administration acknowledged that the proposed rules need fine-tuning, but they added that most should go into effect. Makers of animal drugs, meanwhile, protested that the agency is drastically overreacting.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the federal laboratory that tests for foot-and-mouth disease said Tuesday that travel patterns have increased the possibility of the disease moving from England to the United States. "The chances are greater today than they were three months ago," said David Huxsoll, director of the Department of Agriculture's Plum Island Laboratory here. "There are a lot of people who go to Europe. They go through Britain."
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday joined the Senate in voting to protect the nation's wheat farmers from the adverse effects of U.S. sanctions aimed at punishing India and Pakistan for nuclear tests they conducted in May. On a voice vote, House members exempted for one year agricultural commodities from the economic embargo that U.S. law required President Clinton to impose against the two nations. Before the vote, lawmakers expressed concern that the financial damage the sanctions cause U.S.
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