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NEWS
April 18, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the federal laboratory that tests for foot-and-mouth disease said Tuesday that travel patterns have increased the possibility of the disease moving from England to the United States. "The chances are greater today than they were three months ago," said David Huxsoll, director of the Department of Agriculture's Plum Island Laboratory here. "There are a lot of people who go to Europe. They go through Britain."
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NEWS
July 15, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday joined the Senate in voting to protect the nation's wheat farmers from the adverse effects of U.S. sanctions aimed at punishing India and Pakistan for nuclear tests they conducted in May. On a voice vote, House members exempted for one year agricultural commodities from the economic embargo that U.S. law required President Clinton to impose against the two nations. Before the vote, lawmakers expressed concern that the financial damage the sanctions cause U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | Associated Press
With millions of dollars of U.S. wheat exports on the line, the Senate voted Thursday to exempt agriculture credits from sanctions imposed on India and Pakistan in response to their nuclear detonations in May. "The sanctions are supposed to squeeze the targeted country, not the American producer," said Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). "We should not sacrifice our farmers in an effort to put the nuclear genie back in the bottle."
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Declaring that U.S. foreign policy shouldn't hurt farmers, President Clinton signed legislation exempting agricultural products from sanctions imposed on Pakistan and India, and the Senate later voted to give the president broad authority to temporarily lift all economic sanctions against the two countries. Clinton signed the farm measure late Tuesday, after the House and Senate rushed the bill through.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Settling a costly trade dispute, U.S. apple growers have reached a compromise with Mexico that allows them to resume shipments to the growing market south of the border. Under the plan, announced Friday, Mexico will drop a stiff 101% tariff that it imposed last September, pricing U.S. Red and Golden Delicious apples out of the market. U.S. producers, in turn, will agree to charge a minimum price, thereby making it easier for Mexican apple growers to compete.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman on Friday unveiled a proposal intended to make the nation's Depression-era system of pricing milk more market-oriented, but the reform effort drew harsh criticism from producers. For consumers, the effect would be minimal: Officials estimated that retail milk prices nationally would fall about 3 cents a gallon over a six-year period. But for farmers and dairy processors in some regions, the changes could be profound.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Could it be that the best thing that ever happened to the organic industry was the specter of allowing irradiation, biotechnology and sewage sludge as fertilizer in organic farming and food processing? "This mess does have a silver lining," said Diane Bowen, executive director of California Certified Organic Farmers, a certifying organization in Santa Cruz.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Starting today, the government will allow farmers to display a seal on meat and dairy products to attest that they treat their cattle and chickens humanely. But the voluntary standards are so stringent that few farmers initially can meet them. To qualify for the "free farmed" seal, farms would have to eliminate cages for laying hens and stop using forced molting, the withdrawal of food and water to increase egg production. Dairy cattle would have to have access to pastures.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2000 | Associated Press
With the nation awash in sugar, the government is preparing to give some of the surplus to farmers who pledge to destroy some of this fall's crop. Officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture said that's the most feasible way to prop up domestic sugar prices at the least cost to taxpayers, although a final decision has not yet been made. Critics derided the idea as a desperate attempt to bail out growers, who are partly to blame for the surplus.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 20 years of growing wheat in North Dakota, Charles Linderman has gotten used to digging out of snowdrifts hurled in by late February gusts from Canada. These days it is a harsh wind blowing in from the southeast--Washington, to be exact--that has the normally laid-back Linderman in an uproar.
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