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United States Ambassadors Japan

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March 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush named former Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr. to be ambassador to Japan, saying he was proud to tap "a true statesman" for the important diplomatic post. Baker would replace former House Speaker Thomas S. Foley. "Howard Baker will represent our country with honor and distinction," Bush said in a statement. Baker, 75, made an unsuccessful run for the White House in 1980.
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NEWS
March 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush named former Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr. to be ambassador to Japan, saying he was proud to tap "a true statesman" for the important diplomatic post. Baker would replace former House Speaker Thomas S. Foley. "Howard Baker will represent our country with honor and distinction," Bush said in a statement. Baker, 75, made an unsuccessful run for the White House in 1980.
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NEWS
June 10, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton is tapping former Vice President Walter F. Mondale to be ambassador to Japan, a move underscoring the high priority the Administration attaches to improving economic relations with Tokyo. Mondale has accepted the job and his nomination is likely to be announced shortly, a senior Administration official said Wednesday. White House Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers said an announcement was likely as soon as the nomination clears diplomatic hurdles in Tokyo.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter F. Mondale's announcement that he will retire next month after three years as U.S. ambassador to Japan throws open yet another key post in the second Clinton administration. "I would have liked him to stay on for the new Clinton administration," said Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, adding that the Japanese people will be "shocked and saddened" by the news.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the mayor of Nagasaki at their side, Walter and Joan Mondale placed a wreath on a stand and looked up to a massive statue in Peace Park, dedicated to victims of the atomic bomb the United States dropped here nearly half a century ago. TV cameras scrutinized their faces, and America's ambassador to Japan and his wife knew they should appear solemn. A bright sun shining in their eyes helped. But so did the enormity of the event for which they were symbolically expressing condolences.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. Ambassador Mike Mansfield, one of Japan's best foreign friends, announced today he is retiring at age 85. Mansfield, whose service to the United States started at 14 when he was an under-age enlistee in the Navy, told a packed news conference at the U.S. Embassy that he and his wife, Maureen, had waited until after the U.S. presidential election to make their decision. "We decided it was time for me to resign at the will of the president, and that has been done," he said.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter F. Mondale's announcement that he will retire next month after three years as U.S. ambassador to Japan throws open yet another key post in the second Clinton administration. "I would have liked him to stay on for the new Clinton administration," said Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, adding that the Japanese people will be "shocked and saddened" by the news.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese have called him Mr. Gaiatsu (foreign pressure). Foreign Ministry officials complain that he ignores proper diplomatic channels by using contacts with businessmen, political leaders and reporters to get his way. But for American businessmen, this soft-spoken, tough talking, 6-foot-4 diplomat has been a valued ally. Michael H. Armacost retires this summer as U.S. ambassador to Japan, leaving behind a U.S.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton nominated former Vice President Walter F. Mondale as his ambassador to Japan Friday, as U.S. and Japanese negotiators embarked on what they later said was a "productive" opening to potentially contentious trade talks. Clinton introduced his new envoy to Tokyo at a Rose Garden ceremony Friday morning, praising the 65-year-old Minnesotan as "a leader of enormous wisdom, courage, compassion and stature."
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton bade a formal adieu to Warren Christopher on Thursday and praised the "steely determination" of his secretary of State as he hinted broadly that he might add Republicans to his Cabinet to help carry out a centrist second-term agenda. Meanwhile, Transportation Secretary Federico Pena and Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich tendered their resignations, and Ambassador to Japan Walter F. Mondale joined the exodus. At the same time, Atty. Gen.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton bade a formal adieu to Warren Christopher on Thursday and praised the "steely determination" of his secretary of State as he hinted broadly that he might add Republicans to his Cabinet to help carry out a centrist second-term agenda. Meanwhile, Transportation Secretary Federico Pena and Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich tendered their resignations, and Ambassador to Japan Walter F. Mondale joined the exodus. At the same time, Atty. Gen.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the mayor of Nagasaki at their side, Walter and Joan Mondale placed a wreath on a stand and looked up to a massive statue in Peace Park, dedicated to victims of the atomic bomb the United States dropped here nearly half a century ago. TV cameras scrutinized their faces, and America's ambassador to Japan and his wife knew they should appear solemn. A bright sun shining in their eyes helped. But so did the enormity of the event for which they were symbolically expressing condolences.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese have called him Mr. Gaiatsu (foreign pressure). Foreign Ministry officials complain that he ignores proper diplomatic channels by using contacts with businessmen, political leaders and reporters to get his way. But for American businessmen, this soft-spoken, tough talking, 6-foot-4 diplomat has been a valued ally. Michael H. Armacost retires this summer as U.S. ambassador to Japan, leaving behind a U.S.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton nominated former Vice President Walter F. Mondale as his ambassador to Japan Friday, as U.S. and Japanese negotiators embarked on what they later said was a "productive" opening to potentially contentious trade talks. Clinton introduced his new envoy to Tokyo at a Rose Garden ceremony Friday morning, praising the 65-year-old Minnesotan as "a leader of enormous wisdom, courage, compassion and stature."
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton is tapping former Vice President Walter F. Mondale to be ambassador to Japan, a move underscoring the high priority the Administration attaches to improving economic relations with Tokyo. Mondale has accepted the job and his nomination is likely to be announced shortly, a senior Administration official said Wednesday. White House Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers said an announcement was likely as soon as the nomination clears diplomatic hurdles in Tokyo.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. Ambassador Mike Mansfield, one of Japan's best foreign friends, announced today he is retiring at age 85. Mansfield, whose service to the United States started at 14 when he was an under-age enlistee in the Navy, told a packed news conference at the U.S. Embassy that he and his wife, Maureen, had waited until after the U.S. presidential election to make their decision. "We decided it was time for me to resign at the will of the president, and that has been done," he said.
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