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United States Ambassadors Luxembourg

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NEWS
June 5, 1999 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton named San Francisco philanthropist and gay activist James C. Hormel as ambassador to Luxembourg on Friday, sidestepping Senate Republican leaders who previously had blocked the nomination. Clinton used special appointment powers available when Congress is in recess to bypass the Senate confirmation process and tap Hormel, 66, as the first openly gay U.S. ambassador.
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NEWS
June 5, 1999 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton named San Francisco philanthropist and gay activist James C. Hormel as ambassador to Luxembourg on Friday, sidestepping Senate Republican leaders who previously had blocked the nomination. Clinton used special appointment powers available when Congress is in recess to bypass the Senate confirmation process and tap Hormel, 66, as the first openly gay U.S. ambassador.
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NEWS
July 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A Senate vote on James Hormel to be the nation's first openly gay ambassador was "not practical" this year, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) said. Lott, who opposes Hormel's nomination to be ambassador to Luxembourg, said that with time running out in this session of Congress, the Senate must concentrate on passing fiscal 1999 spending bills.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A Senate vote on James Hormel to be the nation's first openly gay ambassador was "not practical" this year, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) said. Lott, who opposes Hormel's nomination to be ambassador to Luxembourg, said that with time running out in this session of Congress, the Senate must concentrate on passing fiscal 1999 spending bills.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To court their conservative base, key Senate Republican leaders are digging in their heels on an issue that does not seem ideological at all: Who should be the next U.S. ambassador to a tiny European country most Americans could not find on a map?
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To court their conservative base, key Senate Republican leaders are digging in their heels on an issue that does not seem ideological at all: Who should be the next U.S. ambassador to a tiny European country most Americans could not find on a map?
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